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Supervision and Theoretical Synthesis

Give some thought to your theoretical orientation as a therapist-in-training. What theories are you aware of and which ones "speak" to you? Think about how you perceive people, the origins of client difficulties, time focus (past, present, and/or future), your beliefs about human nature, and how people change.

Give a brief synthesis of what you know/ want to know, where and how you might need/use supervision, and any interventions for which you might be interested in gaining additional information. Also, share your reflections about a personal theoretical orientation you would like to explore.

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Give some thought to your theoretical orientation as a therapist-in-training. What theories are you aware of and which ones "speak" to you? Think about how you perceive people, the origins of client difficulties, time focus (past, present, and/or future), your beliefs about human nature, and how people change.

*Two theoretical orientations that I am most comfortable with are the person-centered approach popularized by Rogers (1979, and the Gestalt approach introduced by Perls (1961).

(a) The theoretical orientation of a person-centered approach

Rogers emphasized the centrality of the therapeutic alliance (i.e. the relationship between the client and the therapist) initially as "client-centered" therapy (Truscott, 2010). A basic assumption of the client-centered therapy is that the human person has a natural tendency by which to discover his or her own potential. This actualizing tendency is described as the inherent inclination to develop the capacity to become self-reliant. Based on Rogerian therapy, people are not controlled by unconscious and environmental forces, but are motivated by purpose and meaning in life. According to Truscott (2010), Rogers held a disdain for scientific methodologies to counseling, and focused on what the client discovers about him or herself. People have the capacity to change, and are able to search for a solution for themselves with limited help form the therapist. In addition, to Rogers' emphasis on the concept of self, he stressed the "unconditional positive regard for others" (i.e., respecting the integrity and rights of others). Rogers maintained that in the development of the self, individuals would naturally develop a respect for the integrity and rights of others. On this basis, an individual's change is his or her ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses two theoretical orientations from a personal perspective.

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