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Differences between Moreland/Levine Model & Tuckman's Model

Tuckman's model involves describing how groups form and coordinate (group-level of analysis). Moreland and Levine's model emphasizes the process involved in how individuals relate to groups (individual-level of analysis).

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The difference between Tuckman's group development and Moreland and Levine's group socialization model is that: Tuckman's model involves describing how groups form and coordinate (group-level of analysis). Moreland and Levine's model emphasizes the process involved in how individuals relate to groups (individual-level of analysis), Tuckman's model suggests that groups progress through a relatively consistent series of stages or phases in their development. In contrast to Tuckman's model, Levine and Moreland's model focuses on a variety of unintentional and intentional mechanisms by which newcomers can produce innovation, defined as any significant change in the structure, dynamics, or performance of a group. Tuckman's model uses rhyming words to identify the stages involved in group development: forming, storming, norming, and performing. Morland and Levine use five stages of group membership: investigation, socialization, maintenance, resocialization and remembrance. In the Tuckman model, forming refers to a phase of coming together and ...

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Tuckman's model suggests that groups progress through a relatively consistent series of stages or phases in their development. Levine and Moreland's model focuses on a variety of unintentional and intentional mechanisms by which newcomers can produce innovation.

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