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Process of Transfer From Sensory System to the Brain

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Regarding the motor system, how is the information transferred from the sensory system to the brain? And then from the brain to the motor system?

What are the neurological mechanisms involved that allow this communication between the brain and the peripheral nervous system?

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Question
Motor system/Sensory system to the brain
Regarding the motor system, how is the information transferred from the sensory system to the brain?
Regarding the motor system, how is the information transferred from the sensory system to the brain? And then from the brain to the motor system?

What are the neurological mechanisms involved that allow this communication between the brain and the peripheral nervous system?

Solution
The transference of information from the sensory system to the brain and then to the motor system is a complicated process. Let us see if we can simplify this process in order to make it easier to understand. According to Cardoso, "Two types of phenomena are involved in processing the nerve impulse: electrical and chemical. Electrical events propagate a signal within a neuron, and chemical processes transmit the signal from one neuron to another or to a muscle cell. The chemical process of interaction between neurons and between neurons and effector cells occur at the end of the axon, in a structure called synapse. Touching very close against the dendrite of another cell (but without material continuity between both cells), the axon releases chemical substances called neurotransmitters, which attach themselves to chemical receptors in the membrane of the following neuron and promote excitatory or inhibitory changes in its membrane." Therefore, when a person senses a stimulus the information is transmitted by neurons using electrochemical impulse signals.
In addition, an ...

Solution Summary

This short paper describes in simple language how information is transferred from the sensory system to the brain. It then describes how the information is process and how it travels to the motor system. Information was gathered from literary articles to aid in describing this process of transference from the brain to the motor system in great details.

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Describe the systems that receive sensory information in these experiments.

The games being developed by Ralph Peterson at Fun Learning and Toy Company need to have many tactile elements in order to appeal to preschoolers. Ralph is having trouble distinguishing between sensation and perception. You devise these experiments to help him comprehend the differences.

Conduct these experiments and record your reactions:

Rub your index fingers gently over a piece of very coarse sandpaper a few times, and rate its coarseness on a scale from 1 (very soft) to 7 (very coarse). After a minute or two, rub the same finger over the paper and again rate its coarseness. Did your perception of the coarseness change? How?

Distribute one cup with sugar water and one with fresh water. Take a sip of the sugar water and swish it around in your mouth for several seconds without swallowing it; gradually it should taste less sweet. After swallowing it (or spitting it back into the cup), taste from the cup containing fresh water. Did the taste of the fresh water surprise you? How?

Take about 15 index cards and a flashlight that is opaque on all sides (so that light shines only through the front) into a very dark room. After placing all 15 cards over the beam of light, slowly remove the cards one at a time until you can barely detect the light, and then count the number of cards that remain over the light. After a few minutes, the light should begin to look brighter. When this is the case, add a card and see if you can still see the light. Repeat this process of gradually adding cards over a 15-minute period. Were you able to detect an increasingly dim light the longer you spent in the dark?

Fill 3 medium-sized bowls with (a) very hot (but not painfully so) tap water, (b) very cold tap water, and (c) a mixture of the very hot and very cold water. Arrange them so that your right hand is in front of the cold water, your left hand is in front of the hot water, and the lukewarm water is in the middle. Submerse your hands into the water (right into cold, left into hot) for about 3 minutes. After 3 minutes, quickly transfer both hands to the lukewarm (middle) bowl. What did you sense?

In all four experiments, you will experience adaptation. What is it? Describe the systems that receive sensory information in these experiments. Also, summarize your responses to the experiments.

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