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Childhood Trauma and Bodily Sensation Interpretations

Why might people whose childhoods were marked by unpredictable or uncontrollable events or by chronic family illnesses be inaccurate interpreters of their bodily sensations? References please.

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Hi,

Complex topic! Let's take a closer look at how research and theorists attempt to explain this phenomenon.

RESPONSE:

1. Why might people whose childhoods were marked by unpredictable or uncontrollable events or by chronic family illnesses be inaccurate interpreters of their bodily sensations?

What we do know from research and clinical data is that childhoods marked by unpredictable or uncontrollable events or by chronic family illnesses can result in people making inaccurate interpreters of their bodily sensations e.g., somatization illness. However, there is no consensus on exactly why this occurs. Most agree, though, that it is a complex set of biological, social, emotional, and familial factors that result in inaccurate interpreters of their bodily sensations.

For example, one proposed explanation is that emotional pain repressed from childhood later expresses itself in the body. This was identified by Freud. He found that through free association (e.g., the patient was encouraged to keep talking, which was a technique called free association, which results in repressed memories coming to conscious awareness), the 'unconscious' physic energy was released when the "unconscious" material became conscious . Then, the physical pain and symptoms disappeared. These patients would today be diagnosed with somatization disorder. However, not everyone that misinterpets ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses why people whose childhoods were marked by unpredictable or uncontrollable events or by chronic family illnesses might be inaccurate interpreters of their bodily sensations. Supplemented with a highly informative article on this topic. References provided in APA format.

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