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Israel and the Palestinians

Try to understand the relationship between Israel and the Palestinians. Any Palestinian state will be deeply dependent on Israel as the Palestinian people are very much a part of the Israeli economy. On the other hand, they would be two separate states. So, to what extent does a resolved situation, that is, peace, make a separate state part of a unified situation?

Briefly Address the following questions:

- What is the history (ancient and modern) of this land that explains the current dispute between the Palestinians and Israelis?
- What are the challenges facing its resolution?
- What recommendations would you offer to advance that outcome?
- What do you think will be the outcome of the next peace talks? Why?

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Try to understand the relationship between Israel and the Palestinians. Any Palestinian state will be deeply dependent on Israel as the Palestinian people are very much a part of the Israeli economy. On the other hand, they would be two separate states. So, to what extent does a resolved situation, that is, peace, make a separate state part of a unified situation?

Briefly Address the following questions:

- What is the history (ancient and modern) of this land that explains the current dispute between the Palestinians and Israelis?

This issue remains highly controversial. The Jews claim that they are the actual, genetic descendants of the Old Testament Israelites. The evidence for this is mixed. Arthur Koestler famously argued that this is not the case, the Israelis are in fact, a Turkic people deriving from the Khazar empire on the Black Sea, destroyed by the Russian Norse just before the turn of the first millennium. Bulan, ruling this trading and mercantile empire, led at least the elite to a mass conversion to Judaism around 739-740AD. Evidence for this is as follows: Yiddish has little in common with Hebrew, and has Turkic, Germanic and Slavonic elements mixed with it. The Jewish encyclopedia is not shy in claiming that race has little to do with modern Jewish identity, and that Jews, in general, are as much Turkish as anything else. The Universal Jewish encyclopedia says:

Khazars, a medieval people, probably related to the Volga Bulgars, whose ruling class adopted Judaism during the 8th cent. The Khazars seem to have emerged during the 6th cent., from the vast nomadic Hun (Turkic) empire which stretched from the steppes of Eastern Europe and the Volga basin to the Chinese frontier. Although it is often claimed that allusions to the Khazars are found as early as 200 C.E., actually they are not mentioned until 627 . . . most Jewish historians date the conversion of the Khazar King to Judaism during the first half of this century [A.D.].

A recent genetic study has pinpointed the Turkish (and non-Semitic) ancestry of modern Jews. Jewish scholar Eran Elhaik of Johns Hopkins, th author of the study, writes:

We conclude that the genome of European Jews is a tapestry of ancient populations including Judaised Khazars, Greco-Roman Jews, ...

Solution Summary

The context resolved in situations are determined for unified situations. The challenges facing its resolution are determined.

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