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    Analyzing and Evaluating Research Questions

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    Article A. Grant, A.M., & Gino, F. (2010). A little thanks goes a long way: Explaining why gratitude expressions motivate prosocial behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98(6), 946-955. doi: 10.1037/a0017;
    In a least 250 or more with references:

    Evaluation the article Grant, A.M., & Gino, F. (2010). A little thanks goes a long way: Explaining why gratitude expressions motivate prosocial behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98(6), 946-955. doi: 10.1037/a0017935; according to the criteria below:

    For the qualitative article, the research questions.
    For the quantitative article, the research questions and testable hypotheses.
    Also identify the variables and the type of hypothesis that is present.

    The evaluation of the assigned article according to the criteria below:
    Grant, A.M., & Gino, F. (2010). A little thanks goes a long way: Explaining why gratitude expressions motivate prosocial behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98(6), 946-955. doi: 10.1037/a0017935
    For the qualitative article, the research questions.

    For the quantitative article, the research questions and testable hypotheses. Also identify the variables and the type of hypothesis that is present.

    The Article B/McGrath, L., & Pistrang, N. (2007). Policeman or friend? Dilemmas in working with homeless young people in the United Kingdom. Journal of Social Issues, 63(3), 589-606. doi 10.1111/j.1540-4560.2007.00525.x. is qualitative study.

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    https://brainmass.com/philosophy/scientific-inquiry/analyzing-evaluating-research-questions-547220

    Solution Preview

    Quantitative article:
    Grant, A.M., & Gino, F. (2010). A little thanks goes a long way: Explaining why gratitude expressions motivate prosocial behavior.

    Previous research had shown that if a person helps another person and receives gratitude, the helper will be more likely to do so again (increased prosocial behavior).

    However, this study went a little further and asked the following questions:
    Why does it encourage such prosocial behavior? What psychological processes ...

    Solution Summary

    The expert analyzes and evaluates research questions. The qualitative and quantitative articles are determined.

    $2.19

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