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Deontological and teleological ethics regarding abortion.

Deontological Theory Teleological (Utilitarian) Theory

In 250 words, briefly describe the basis, considerations, and steps of deontological ethics. Make connections to Plato and Aristotle, as applicable. Refer to the specific moral philosophers involved in deontological theory.

In 250 words, briefly describe the basis, considerations, and steps of teleological ethics. Make connections to Plato and Aristotle, as applicable. Refer to the specific moral philosophers involved in teleological theory.

In 250 words, name a modern conflict "such as the death penalty, abortion, or physician-assisted suicide"and describe how either method could help you in arriving at an ethically sound solution to the problem.

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Deontological Theory Teleological (Utilitarian) Theory

In 250 words, briefly describe the basis, considerations, and steps of deontological ethics. Make connections to Plato and Aristotle, as applicable. Refer to the specific moral philosophers involved in deontological theory.

Deontological Ethics is based on the concept of duty. The morality of a certain choice or course of action is determined by whether that choice or action adheres to a predetermined set of rules or standards. For example when faced with a decision to lie or not, someone who bases their decisions on deontological ethics would choose not to lie because lying breaks the rules. It makes no difference whether the lie has good consequences for me or not. Many philosophers who subscribe to this ethics position base their belief on a religious foundation. The thinking is that rules are right or wrong based on what God has said about them. Lying is wrong because God said so. The same is true for adultery, murder, envy, anger, etc. Honesty, love, forgiveness and respect are good because God said so. Philosophers who fit into this category are René Descartes and Immanuel Kant.

Deontological ethics has its roots in the philosophy of both Plato and Aristotle. Plato stressed achieving true happiness and practical wisdom while Aristotle stressed virtue. However, both of these men believed that happiness, wisdom and virtue were possible to achieve only because an unchanging set of rules did exist. If man functioned within these rules he would achieve these goals, if he chose to function outside of these rules he was essentially lost.

Although most deontological philosophers tend to be moral absolutists, there are some who would argue that while there is a set of predetermined rules that I have the duty to live by, sometimes those rules can and should be broken. For example one can imagine a scenario where I could lie to save ...

Solution Summary

This solution begins with a definition of both deontological and teleological ethics. It then evaluates the abortion issue from both the deontological and the teleological ethical perspective.

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