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Social control theory and childhood activities

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Using social control theory...

A list of the activities that you participated in as a child and a teenager (including sports, camps, religious activities, fine arts, etc.)

Describe the benefits that you gained from participating in each of these activities.

Describe the drawbacks/negative influences (if any) you got from participating in these activities. If you did not get any negative influence or drawback, why was it so. Provide a rationale for your answer.

The kinds of activities you think are essential for kids to participate in today.

Reasons why these specific activities are needed.

How these activities help decrease the likelihood of criminal activities.

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Hello. I've provided the following information to assist you.

A list of the activities that you participated in as a child and a teenager (including sports, camps, religious activities, fine arts, etc.):

I personally participated in track, softball, and Girl Scouts.

Describe the benefits that you gained from participating in each of these activities.

There are benefits that can be gained from any outside activity, in my opinion.

In softball, you learn to work as a team with others so that you can learn how both to be a teammate and a team leader. This is important in later life to understand how a team dynamic works.

In track, you learn to work as a team, but also learn how your individual contribution ...

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