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Juvenile and Adult Offender Treatment Approaches

Please assist with the following:

1. A comparison (similarities and differences) between juvenile and adult offender treatment approaches and programs. Explain at least two similarities and two differences related to treatment approaches and treatment programs. Explain at least one conclusion you drew or insight you gained as a result of your comparison.

2. Explain the role and importance of family in the treatment of juvenile offenders. Be specific

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/whenkidsgetlife/five/

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See attached file for solution. Take what I have here as a detailed outline.

A comparison (similarities and differences) between juvenile and adult offender treatment approaches and programs. Explain at least two similarities and two differences related to treatment approaches and treatment programs. Explain at least one conclusion you drew or insight you gained as a result of your comparison.

The NHMA paper below is essential for this question. Quick summary of the approaches they mention:
Denver, Colo., Juvenile Justice Integrated Treatment Network: this incorporates substance abuse treatment in all aspects of the juvenile justice system. It is a whole, not merely a part of a broader program. In other words, the same virtues that get you away from crime are the same that keep you off drugs. Thus, treatment for one is treatment for both. Lots of cross training.
The DAWN Project of Marion Co, IN. This is something you can use for the next question as well. It is based on the fact that family is the most important ingredient for recovery. If a juvenile offender has mental problems and is in the process of being separated from his family, this County steps in and attempts to "reintegrate" the kid into family life. For this to work, the youth needs to be part of at least two mental health programs offered by the state.
PINS Program of Orange County, NY. For cases in the family court system, similar to the Indiana program above. Each offender gets a Designated Assessment Team which identifies the mental problems and suggests a fairly strict mode of treatment. It is radically individualized. The Team serves as a case manager and can even plead for the child in court or in state agencies.
Family Crisis Intervention Unit (FCIU) is a program within the Lexington County Community Mental Health Center in South Carolina is similar to the DAWN project, and a bit like PINS. It focuses around "family systems therapy." (more on this below). The point here is that the intimacy of the family makes it indispensable. Recovery is based on teamwork among family members (acting as a single unit). This programs offers training in how this might be done.
The PACE Center for Girls is full service. Focused on Jacksonville, FL, a full range of services are given to girls in the system: communication skills, sexual choices, basic living skills career skills, counseling, basic case management at all levels. All of this is done in one place, and all is part of a very broad and holistic treatment method.

For adults, there is sexual offender treatment in Washington Prisons. It is not all that different from the juvenile ones above, it is based largely on CBT methods: thoughts are to be undistorted. The Rose Good method is very similar to PACE, and seems to be holistic. All aspects of offender reintegration are dealt with. It can, but does not need to, take place while incarcerated. Same goes for CCA, a private prison firm. Both programs deal with the full range of skill learning from gardening to working with word processors.

Two similarities are holism and the "mental" dimension. This means that a) juvenile justice and adult programs must deal with the whole person. All aspects of life are involved with crime and alienation, and therefore, treatment must be as well. The concept of integration comes up again and ...

Solution Summary

A comparison between juvenile and adult offender treatment approaches and programs are determined. The role and importance of family in the treatment of juvenile offenders are explained.

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