Share
Explore BrainMass

The New Deal: Views on Business

The government's general attitude towards business in the 1920s was that relationships between the government and businessmen had never been greater or stronger than they where at that time. There was four major ways in which the federal government supported big business:

1. High tariff policies.
2. Andrew Mellon.
3. Cutbacks in the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
4. Herbert Hoover.

Why did we feel that way? Wasn't this indicative of the public's attitude toward business as well?

Solution Preview

Interesting questions! Please see response below. I hope this help sand take care.

RESPONSE:

1. Why did we feel that way? Wasn't this indicative of the public's attitude toward business as well?

The 1920s have been dubbed everything from "The Roaring Twenties" and "The Era of Wonderful Nonsense" to "The Decade of the Dollar" and "The Period of the Psyche" to the "Dry Decade" and the age of "Alcohol and Al Capone." Many historians regard the years between World War I and the stock-market crash of 1929 as the culmination of a long process of social change, which Frederick Lewis Allen described as a "revolution in manners and morals." (1)

The 1920s opened in the aftermath of World War I. The war's brutality and devastation in Europe culminated in euphoria ...

Solution Summary

Based on the scenario, this solution examines why the country felt that way and if it was indicative of the public's attitude toward business as well.

$2.19