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    Power of the Federal Government (19th century)

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    How did the states react to the increasing power of the federal government in the 19th century?

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    https://brainmass.com/history/north-american-history/power-federal-government-century-96070

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    1. How did the states react to the increasing power of the federal government in the 19th century? Please explain?

    The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. It was adopted in its original form on September 17, 1787 by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and later ratified by state-selected delegates representing the people of the several states.[1],[2] When delegates in nine states of the then thirteen states ratified the document, it marked the creation of a union of sovereign states, and a federal government to administer that union. It replaced the weaker, less well-defined union that existed under the Articles of Confederation and took effect on March 4, 1789. The Constitution of the United States is the oldest federal constitution currently in use.[3] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Constitution
    Within a federal system, the term state also refers to political units, not sovereign themselves, but subject to the authority of the larger state, or federal union, such as the "states" in the United States. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State
    The federal government was given increasing power in the 19th century. In fact, the Constitution granted numerous powers to Congress, the federal government. These include the powers: to levy and collect taxes in order to pay debts, provide for common defense and general welfare of the U.S.; to borrow money on the credit of the U.S.; to regulate commerce with other nations and between the states; to establish a uniform rule of naturalization; to coin money and regulate its value; provide for punishment of counterfeiting; establish post offices and roads, promote progress of science, create courts inferior to the Supreme Court, define and punish piracies and felonies, declare war, raise and support armies, provide and maintain a navy, ...

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    This solution examines how the states react to the increasing power of the federal government in the 19th century. References ar provided.

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