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National Security Roots: The Cold War

I have some questions about Foner's Chapter 23 and Kinzer's book "Overthrow".

1) What effect did the Cold War have on American culture? What about effects with regard to anti-communism?

2) How did the sentiment of a national security state created along with the CIA and House Committee on Un-American Activities' (HUAC) Blacklisting in 1947, McCarthyism, and COINTELPRO in 1956 impact American politics, culture, and society? (How did each of these impact in those ways?)

3) Are there any recognized parallels to American society post 9/11? Why and what are they?

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National Security Roots: The Cold War

Hi again! I know I say this quite a bit, but I really do appreciate the opportunity to keep helping you.

1. I think the best way to describe the effect of the Cold War would be terrifying. This refers to terrifying both in the sheer ability of citizens to ride waves of fear and in terrifying the citizens themselves. Talk to anybody who had to go through "bomb cover drills" at school (like your grandparents), and I'm sure you'll find that quite a few people were instilled with an automatic distrust of foreigners or vague, unknown threats. It not only isolated the country, it also kept it in a fierce fight to stay on top of the global economy for fear of losing influence to protect itself. Specifically when it came to anti-communism, you had people almost in fear like it were the Salem Witch Trials?except with hidden communists among the citizenry, not witches. Culture, politics, economy, law enforcement pretty much all centered on anti-communism, to the point that such a focus was taken for granted or natural.

2. The CIA was ...

Solution Summary

National security roots for The Cold War is examined.

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