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Civil Rights - Ballot or the Bullet & Malcolm X

In "the Ballot or the Bullet" Malcolm X argues for Black Nationalism, while in their selections, Martin Luther King and Stokely Carmichael argues that changes need to be made by specific white groups. Martin Luther King's has the most effective argument. Why? and How?


1. I must contrast to Malcolm X and Stokley.
2. Explain the logic behind Martin's passive resistance.

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1. I must contrast to Malcolm X and Stokely.

King (1929-1968) has been referred to one of the most visible advocates of nonviolence and direct action as methods of social change. He was born in Atlanta on 15 January 1929, with roots in the African-American Baptist church. (Grandfather and father were ministers).

Both Carmichael (1941 - 1998) and Malcolm X (1925-1965) argued for separation between the white and the black, and rejection of American and all 'white' values based on the ideals of the nation of Islam. However, later he rejected the Nation of Islam and embraced integration between black and white, similar to King. However, Malcolm X promoted anger as the motive for action and allowed for violence in self-defense only: "Be peaceful, be courteous, obey the law, respect everyone; but if someone puts his hand on you, send him to the cemetery." (Malcolm X, Malcolm X Speaks, 1965) (

For example, Stokely Carmichael was a "Black Power" (see proponent, who indeed criticized Martin Luther King, Jr. publicly. It was the 27th time that Carmichael had been arrested and on his release on 16th June, he made his famous Black Power speech. Carmichael called for "black people in this country to unite, to recognize their heritage, and to build a sense of community". He also advocated that African Americans should form and lead their own organizations and urged a complete rejection of the values of American society. He has been criticized for black racism. ...

Solution Summary

This solution assists in contrasting Malcolm X to Carmichae Stokley, as well as explains the logic behind Martin's passive resistance.