Share
Explore BrainMass

Issues in US Reconstruction

Reconstruction discussion often points out achievements and criticisms of the South's political culture. But the North experienced successes and failures in these years. Why have these events below lasted so long in elements of the nation's post Civil War history?
a. Crédit Mobilier

b. The Whiskey ring

c. The Tweed ring

Solution Preview

Reconstruction is the name for the period in United States history that covers the post-Civil War era, roughly 1865-1877. Technically, it refers to the policies that focused on the aftermath of the war; abolishing slavery, defeating the Confederacy, and putting legislation in effect to restore the nation - per the Constitution. Most contemporary historians view Reconstruction as a failure with ramifications that lasted at least 100 years later: issues surrounding Civil Rights were still being debated in the 1970s, corrupt northern businessmen "carpetbaggers" brought scandal and economic corruption, monetary and tariff policies were retributive and had legal results in the north as well.

Three particular events scandalized the North during this period of time; so powerful were these scandals that their legacy was felt for generations hence: the Credit Mobilier Affair, the Whiskey Ring, and the Boss Tweed Scandal.

The Credit Mobilier Affair of 1872 has become a symbol of post-Civil War corruption. It involved illegal manipulation of contracts by a construction and finance company, Credit Mobilier, and the Union Pacific Railroad. The affair was complex, but essentially ...

Solution Summary

The solution provides a concise discussion of Credit Mobilier, The Whiskey Ring and the Tweed Ring - events and issues that had its origins in events Post American Civil War - during the era of National Reconstruction. Said affairs involved political corruption and criminal acts from key personalities of the period whose actions made said affairs/events infamous making them events in early American history from which lessons can be gleaned.

$2.19