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After reading this article why would you suggest that most o

After reading this article why would you suggest that most of the Arab countries and most other third world countries have a larger population percentage under 20 than most industrialized countries? How could this affect the US reconstruction policies in Iraq and Afghanistan?

The Supply and Demand for Children
In Chapter 1, I distinguished between an economic force and a market force. Economic forces are operative in all aspects of our lives; market forces are economic forces that are allowed to be expressed through a market. My examples in this chapter are of market forces - of goods sold n a market - but supply and demand also can be used to analyze situations in which economic, but not market, forces operate. An economist who is adept at this is Gary Becker of the University of Chicago. He has applied supply and demand analysis to a wide range of issues, even the supply and demand for children.
Becker doesn't argue that children should be bought and sold. But he does argue that economic considerations play a large role in people's decisions on how many children to have. In farming communities, children can be productive early in life; by age six or seven, they can work on a farm. In an advanced industrial community, children provide pleasure but generally don't contribute productively to family income. Even getting them to help around the house can be difficult.
Becker argues that since the price of having children is lower for a farming society than for an industrial society, farming societies will have more children per family. Quantity of children demanded will be larger. And that's what we find. Developing countries that rely primarily on farming often have three, four, or more children per family. Industrial societies average fewer than two children per family.

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Many third world countries, and many third world - Asian countries have a high population of individuals under twenty years old because those are the individuals that are still actively needed on the farms, and to do a good percentage of the work. Not many people have more energy than a young, growing teenager. A teenage boy has likely been trained to care for every aspect of the farm. When kids get older, and they near over twenty years old, one of two things happen. First, they realize that they have options, and they take the first opportunity that they have to ...

Solution Summary

After reading this article why would you suggest that most of the Arab countries and most other third world countries have a larger population percentage under 20 than most industrialized countries? How could this affect the US reconstruction policies in Iraq and Afghanistan?

The Supply and Demand for Children
In Chapter 1, I distinguished between an economic force and a market force. Economic forces are operative in all aspects of our lives; market forces are economic forces that are allowed to be expressed through a market. My examples in this chapter are of market forces - of goods sold n a market - but supply and demand also can be used to analyze situations in which economic, but not market, forces operate. An economist who is adept at this is Gary Becker of the University of Chicago. He has applied supply and demand analysis to a wide range of issues, even the supply and demand for children.
Becker doesn't argue that children should be bought and sold. But he does argue that economic considerations play a large role in people's decisions on how many children to have. In farming communities, children can be productive early in life; by age six or seven, they can work on a farm. In an advanced industrial community, children provide pleasure but generally don't contribute productively to family income. Even getting them to help around the house can be difficult.
Becker argues that since the price of having children is lower for a farming society than for an industrial society, farming societies will have more children per family. Quantity of children demanded will be larger. And that's what we find. Developing countries that rely primarily on farming often have three, four, or more children per family. Industrial societies average fewer than two children per family.

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