Explore BrainMass
Share

Explore BrainMass

    historical quarantine methods to modern methods

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    How are historical quarantine methods similar to modern methods? How have methods changed and are historical methods superior or inferior to modern methods? What effects to modern personal rights have on historical methods? How has modern science changed in the methods used in quarantine?

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 10, 2019, 2:33 am ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/disease-outbreak-control/historical-quarantine-methods-modern-methods-382680

    Solution Preview

    Multi-Drug Resistance-Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person to person through the air. TB usually affects the lungs, but it can also affect other parts of the body, such as the brain, the kidneys, or the spine. In most cases, TB is treatable; however, persons with TB can die if they do not get proper treatment. Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is TB that is resistant to at least two of the best anti-TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampicin. These drugs are considered first-line drugs and are used to treat all persons with TB disease.

    Extensively drug resistant TB (XDR TB) is a relatively rare type of MDR TB. XDR TB is defined as TB which is resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, plus resistant to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of three injectable second-line drugs (i.e., amikacin, kanamycin, or capreomycin). Because XDR TB is resistant to first-line and second line drugs, patients are left with treatment options that are much less effective. XDR TB is of special concern for persons with HIV infection or other conditions that can weaken the immune system. These
    persons are more likely to develop TB disease once they are infected, and also have a higher risk of death once they develop TB. Drug-susceptible TB and MDR TB are spread the same way. TB germs are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. These germs can float in the air for several hours, depending on the environment. Persons who breathe in the air containing these TB germs can become infected.

    Resistance to anti-TB drugs can occur when these drugs are misused or mismanaged. Examples include when patients do not complete their full course of treatment; when health-care providers prescribe the wrong treatment, the wrong dose, or length of time for taking the drugs; when the supply of drugs is not always available; or when the drugs are of poor quality.

    Drug resistance is more common in people who:

    - do not take their ...

    Solution Summary

    This solution compares historical quarantine methods to modern methods. References are also listed to promote research.

    $2.19