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    What should the role of the PHI should be in creating Healthy Cities, and to include this idea of transparency. Specifically, how could the PHI be involved in Community Participation, Intersect oral planning, Public Health at the Local Level, in relation to WHO healthy city program?

    I have include the link to WHO, to explain what a healthy city is (http://www.euro.who.int/eprise/main/who/progs/hcp/How2MakeCities/20020114_2).

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 5:11 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/determinants-of-health/role-public-health-inspectors-33583

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    Please refer to attached file response.

    1. "I am thinking the key to the PHI role in Healthy Cities is Transparency between all categories involved. The PHI could aide in supporting and being involved in each step--to interconnect all categories to make them work together. I am hoping an OTA can aide in what their opinion on what the role of the PHI should be in creating Healthy Cities, and to include this idea of transparency.

    The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines the word transparency (noun) as the quality or state of being transparent. To be in a state of being transparent, means that an object or situation has the property of transmitting light without appreciable scattering so that bodies lying beyond are seen clearly or allowing the passage of a specified form of radiation (as X rays or ultraviolet light). The second meaning is more in line with this question, transparent means that something is fine or sheer enough to be seen through, free from pretense or deceit or to be frank--and when something is easily detected or seen through. In other words, the situation is obvious and readily understood. (http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=transparency&x=7&y=15).

    In other words, what you seem to be suggesting is that the role that the PHI could play in creating Healthy Cities is obvious and clear and easily understood. This may not be the case, as the WHO project for healthy cities is broad and comprehensive including a NETWORK of people ranging across the globe. This, the role of the PHI would be a small piece of the whole. In other words, the PHI is one member of many (including nations and countries of people) working together with the other members, to make a whole and, thus, a difference—a change—a move closer to the ultimate goal of healthy cities.

    Change is never easy, nor totally clear, new health information is always coming in, etc. Thus, the need for continued evaluation and monitoring of the unlimited variables that has the potential to obstruct or impede movement toward to end goal—that of every city meeting the criteria for healthy cites. Before we get into the specific role that the PHI can play in this large NETWORK of people, organization, and countries, I am going to re-read the information on the website that you kindly provided. Finished *smile*

    This is my take. WHO suggests to the NETWORK (which includes PHI) that in order for successful implementation of this approach, it "requires explicit political commitment, leadership and institutional change, intersectoral partnerships, innovative actions addressing all aspects of health and living conditions, and extensive networking between cities across Europe and beyond." Obviously, PHI will be part of the larger NETWORK of people, but how does the PHI exactly fit into the larger scheme of things, and what can the PHI do at the local level? This leads us to your second question.
    2. "Specifically how could the PHI be involved in--Community Participation, Intersect oral planning, Public Health at the Local Level, in relation to WHO healthy city program." I have include the link to WHO, to explain what a healthy city is
    http://www.euro.who.int/eprise/main/who/progs/hcp/How2MakeCities/20020114_2
    On the site provided, WHO says that through NETWORKING of people who have an explicit political commitment, leadership and institutional change, intersectoral partnerships, innovative actions addressing all aspects of health and living conditions, and extensive networking between cities across Europe and beyond (let's assume that the PHI meets these criteria), the four elements for action will be addressed:
    A
    Explicit political commitment at the highest level to the principles and strategies of the Healthy Cities project C
    Commitment to developing a shared vision for the city, with a health plan and work on specific themes
    B
    Establishment of new organizational structures to manage change D
    Investment in formal and informal networking and cooperation

    In fact, the European Office of WHO and the European Network of National Healthy Cities Networks recommend basic criteria for a healthy city (see Action Framework), which are based on the four elements for action. Please read the Action Framework. Thus, from this chart and the information in the action platform for phase three of the "Healthy City" project, it is obvious that, although each block or action step is a separate objectives (with separate sub-goals mandated to accomplish each objective), together they will meet the basic criteria for a healthy city.
    Where does the Public Health Inspector fit into this broad comprehensive scheme?
    Obviously, the Public Health Inspectors is one of many parts of a whole network of people, organizations, and even countries. In this broad comprehensive project, the PHI and the organization that employs the PHI would have to commit to these political objections put forth by WHO (and the four actions in the chart) for meeting the "Healthy City" criteria, probably at the local level (but must also be committed the whole NETWORK as suggested by WHO), and the objectives set forth to meet these main goals (listed below).
    Once this commitment is in place, the PHI would be part of the larger Network working toward common objectives listed below. The main word here is "part of" the Network—not the whole network. In other words, the PHI may be involved in one area of focus and not the other. In other words, one member of the Network cannot be the end all be all, but part of the whole (including the PHI). The PHI would be part of the WHO NETWORK politically committed to healthy cities, probably working at the local level. In other words, the PHI would be one piece of the puzzle working towards a common end, mainly a move toward the criteria "for healthy cities across Europe and beyond. The objectives set by WHO (some at the national level, some at the local level of change, and others are at both levels) are as follows:
    Objectives of the NETWORK
    7.1 To enhance co-operation between national networks and their members.
    7.2 To improve communication between national networks and between cities.
    7.3 To raise the quality of healthy cities.
    7.4 To raise the quality of national healthy cities networks to the standards of this NETWORK and to encourage the development of new national networks.
    7.5 To provide / develop / disseminate tools for healthy cities work.
    7.6 To work in partnership with WHO to influence national policy.
    7.7 To form partnerships with other international organisations and bodies. (http://www.euro.who.int/eprise/main/who/progs/hcp/Documentation/20011106_1).
    How about at the local level? How can the PHI meet the main objective: To raise the health and living conditions of people living in cities and towns across Europe? Mainly, the PHI would be doing the same things, only at the local level.
    What exactly will the PHI be doing at the local level of the larger WHO NETWORK? To answer this, then let's go back and look at 7.1 through 7.7 to determine which ones apply to PHI at the local level. I highlighted with bold print the objectives that were eight national, local or both and then proceeded to list what specifically the PHI could do at the local level to meet each objective. These lists are not exhaustive, of course, but some of the main ideas are touched on.
    7.1 To enhance co-operation between national networks and their members. (National level)
    7.2 To improve communication between national networks and between cities. (Both local and National) The PHI would be responsible to improve communication between cities in his locale:
    a. By providing leadership (i.e., by calling meetings of other city members, network calls, etc.)
    b. By keeping informed through open communication with other city organizations and leaders about new innovative ideas for healthy cities—ones that may help in their city, etc.
    7.3 To raise the quality of healthy cities (This is at local level). How could the PHI raise the quality of healthy cities? Mainly by:
    a. Providing leadership and institutional change (i.e., community meeting, educating the city on the concept of "healthy city", educate the city people of the criteria for healthy cities, the idea of consultation and educating the community at large is to moving toward the community owning the problem to get commitment to change at the local level, etc.)
    b. By developing intersectoral partnerships (i.e., this relates to the first, only this may be directed more at other local city organizations, developers, planners, than the local people. The PHI would be providing leadership (i.e. being active in community, sharing information, training and educating the public sphere about healthy living and potential harmful living as well, etc.) and ideas for institutional changes necessary to meet the criteria for healthy cities (i.e., teaching, consulting, training, etc. with the same goal in mind, that of Networking and drawing in partnerships to meet the common goal of moving toward healthy cities that meet the criteria set forth by WHO, etc.)
    c. By taking innovative actions addressing all aspects of health and living conditions (i.e., by being active in the community, being committed to take action to be innovated when potential barriers and variables that are not healthy or potentially harmful to community living, risking new innovative ideas and implementation, etc.)
    d. By developing an extensive networking (phoning, meeting, consulting with other PHI, other health and city organizations, developers, planners of community development, to educate about healthy city criteria as well as unhealthy risks--pollution, the health hazards of over crowding, the city planners to increase the number of parks to allow exercise and recreation that is health promoting, proper run-offs and the correct amount of vegetation necessary for proper run-off in order to prevent polluted water, etc.)
    e. Plus all the other mandates of his or her job description (i.e., inspecting, evaluating health conditions, monitoring development sites, etc.)
    7.4 To raise the quality of national healthy cities networks to the standards of this NETWORK and to encourage the development of new national networks (both local and national levels). At the local level, the PHI could accomplish this:
    a. By networking, being active, being innovative in their ideas toward promoting and teaching about healthy city criteria (i.e., meetings, networking calls, advertising, presentations, etc.)
    7.5 To provide / develop / disseminate tools for healthy cities work (Local level). Many of the above actions apply here too, and to add to this, the PHI could be part of this network by:
    a. Providing the information to planners and developers, the knowledge necessary to meet the criteria for healthy city criteria (i.e., vegetation for healthy run-off, information about the possible illnesses due to polluted water, attending city meeting, etc.)
    7.6 To work in partnership with WHO to influence national policy (National level)
    7.7 To form partnerships with other international organizations and bodies (National level)
    FINAL COMMENT. Transparency may not be the best words to describe this somewhat complicated NETWORK of change. However, the PHI role would be somewhat transparent to the individual, however, change is never linear, nor is it always clear. Thus, the need for inspecting, evaluating and monitoring of plans and projects. Mainly, in order to determine if the plan needs to be changed, improvised somewhat or discarded completely in order to make a better plan for change, one that meets the objective. As new health information comes in about what constitutes healthy living, for example, plans may need to be changed or improvised to incorporate the new information. Obviously, considering all the above actions of the PHI listed above, she or he play a large part in the action plan presented by WHO (see chart of the four action steps): 1) explicit political commitment at the highest level to the principles and strategies of the Healthy Cities project 2) establishment of new organizational structures to manage change, 3) commitment to developing a shared vision for the city, with a health plan and work on specific themes 4) Investment in formal and informal networking and cooperation.
    I hope this helps and take care.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 5:11 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/determinants-of-health/role-public-health-inspectors-33583

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