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A Way to Read and Write about ANY text: Aristotle's pathos, logos, and ethos

How can Aristotle's division of pathos, ethos, and logos apply to virtually any piece of writing or literature, and help me build a paper?

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A POPULAR FRAMEWORK FOR READING AND WRITING: Aristotle's pathos, logos, and ethos

In a number of English departments, a recent focus has been to read critically using what Aristotle defined as the three means of effecting persuasion. Within his Rhetoric, Aristotle dismantles the extent to which we are impacted, or persuaded, by a text into three categories:

ETHOS: the sense the reader gains of the author's character, identity, and credibility. This rises both from what the writer says, and does not say. This includes things the writer offers about him or herself and background experience related to the topic at hand. It is also the level to which the writer anticipates and refutes opposing arguments. Anything that a writer includes that builds audience trust, or pits the writer as a likeable, intelligent, aware source of information, falls in the realm of ...

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