Explore BrainMass

Explore BrainMass

    Richard Wright's "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" reader response

    Not what you're looking for? Search our solutions OR ask your own Custom question.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    Give a short interpretation of Richard Wright's "The Man Who Was Almost a Man."

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:55 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/618682

    SOLUTION This solution is FREE courtesy of BrainMass!

    Welcome to BM! Please rate 5/5 for my ideas.

    My interpretation of Richard Wright's "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" coincides with themes happening today in 2016 with Black Lives Matter in terms of social activism. Through the characterization of Dave, it seems like Wright is reiterating how African Americans are deeply marginalized and targeted in society, not only socially but also emotionally, economically, and politically. The racist treatment of blacks is demonstrated in the dialogue of "Whut's the use talkin wid em niggers in the field? Anyhow, his mother was putting supper on the table. Them niggers; can't understan nothing."

    Besides, it seems like the gun is a symbol for the power that Dave wants to possess and again makes me think about how many black teens turn to crime because of self-fulfilling prophecies and stigmas against black men and minorities in America. Dave yearns to use a gun and "One of these days he was going to get a gun and practice shooting, then they couldn't talk to him as though he were a little boy. He slowed, looking at the ground. Shucks, Ah ain scareda them even ef they are biggem me!" The gun seems to be a way for him to seek retribution for the prejudice and hate imposed on blacks.

    Even Wright's title "The Man Who Was Almost a Man," seems to imply that black men and teens struggle for justice, respect, and life in American society due to the perpetuation of stereotypes and struggles that they must endure because of their race. The tragic accident with Jenny also shows how gun violence is destroying the black community, both historically and now, as I feel like Wright is using literature for social protest and social commentary to help us to protect our black youth and help them to grow into honorable men as the ending alludes: "Ahead the long rails were glinting in the moonlight, stretching away, away to somewhere, somewhere where he could be a man ..."

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:55 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/618682

    ADVERTISEMENT