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    Dostoevsky's "Notes from the Underground"

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    Give a short interpretation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Notes from the Underground."

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:55 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/618675

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    In essence, my own interpretation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Notes from the Underground" reveals that this piece is highly political and philosophical in its ramifications. He seems to be rejecting some of the popular and prominent ideologies of his era that Existentialism the end-all. Instead, I react that this piece infers that we should relish our faith and Christian sense of morality.

    Beyond that, I think that the fact that Dostoevsky employs many prominent symbols to suggest that science alone cannot fulfill man seems to also operate with the religious convictions. His reference to the crystal place seems like a symbol to me as he discusses how "But while I am alive and have desires I would rather my hand were withered off than bring one brick to such a building! Don't remind me that I have just rejected the palace of crystal for the sole reason that one cannot put out one's tongue at it. I did not say because I am so fond of putting my tongue out. Perhaps the thing I resented was, that of all your edifices there has not been one at which one could not put out one's tongue. On the contrary, I would let my tongue be cut off out of gratitude if things could be so arranged that I should lose all desire to put it out. It is not my fault that things cannot be so arranged, and that one must be satisfied with model flats. Then why am I made with such desires? Can I have been constructed simply in order to come to the conclusion that all my construction is a cheat? Can this be my whole purpose? I do not believe it." This rant seems to suggest the existence of a higher power and purpose, which I infer as God.

    I also see that he seems to celebrate and encourage free will as he suggests, "And one may choose what is contrary to one's own interests, and sometimes one POSITIVELY OUGHT (that is my idea). One's own free unfettered choice, one's own caprice, however wild it may be, one's own fancy worked up at times to frenzy--is that very "most advantageous advantage" which we have overlooked, which comes under no classification and against which all systems and theories are continually being shattered to atoms." This rejection of science seems evident in his bitter comments, "what sort of free will is left when we come to tabulation and arithmetic, when it will all be a case of twice two make four? Twice two makes four without my will. As if free will meant that!"

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:55 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/618675

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