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    Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself"

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    A brief interpretation of Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" is included.

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:54 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/617669

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    Please rate 5 for my 300 words of brainstorming.

    While I acknowledge many of his historical and political assertions in this poem, my interpretation of Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" is that it seems to strongly celebrate nature and regards nature as a major spiritual rejuvenation to a large extent. He seems to imply that the mere observation and engagement of nature brings peace and soulfulness: "I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass." His acknowledgement of this inner sense of divine is also demonstrated when he adds, "I believe in you my soul, the other I am must not abase itself to you, And you must not be abased to the other." This deep connection to the Earth is reiterated clearly: " I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love, If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles."

    Nature further offers him a sense of ecstasy as he reveals, "The sound of the belch'd words of my voice loos'd to the eddies of the wind, A few light kisses, a few embraces, a reaching around of arms" and other passages, like "I will go to the bank by the wood and become undisguised and naked/ I am mad for it to be in contact with me."

    Beyond that, I infer that his poem also contains implications of human connections as this communal attitude is evoked when he remarks, "For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you" as well as in "I am the mate and companion of people, all just as immortal and fathomless as myself..."

    Like a thread, it seems like he believes that nature unites us as a human race, as he suggests, "My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air, Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their/ parents the same..." This interconnectivity is proclaimed here as "And that all the men ever born are also my brothers, and the women/ my sisters and lovers, And that a kelson of the creation is love..."

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:54 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/617669

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