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The Yellow Wallpaper Summary

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Please help. This is supposed to be a group project but I really haven't had much help in that are. The assignment had three parts. I have already completed the first two but I am having problems pulling the last part together: here is what it asks to do.

1. Examine your group's first set of responses and look for ways in which your interpretations agreed with and/or disagreed with the sample student essays.
2 As a group, create one essay that summarizes your group's responses to all of the questions above.

The essay should be a report about the conclusions that group came to, both about the story and about the sample student explications of the story. Since participation isn't what it was supposed to be I'm having a hard time here.

I have attached parts 1 and 2. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/literature-arts/yellow-wallpaper-summary-49185

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Solution Preview

Please see response attached (some of which is provided below). I hope this helps and take care.

RESPONSE:

I am trying to figure out the best way to provide you with some sense of direction here. I decided to provide a tentative outline and, then, do a draft analysis of Part 1 and Part 2, which is presented below (with considerations highlighted in red IN THE ATTACHED RESPONSE). I drew some of your information from part 1 and 2 for illustrative purposes:

I. Introduction (1/4 to ½ page, ending with the statement of the purpose of your report)

Based on Gillman's own experience with post-partum depression, "The Yellow Wallpaper" is a first person narrative of a woman's decent into mental illness. Confined, she becomes obsessed with the yellow wallpaper decorating the room. By the end of the story, she has descended into ...

Solution Summary

This solution provides ideas and suggestions for a report about the conclusions that group came to, both about the story and about the sample student explications of the story.

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"The Yellow Wallpaper"

Part I:
Read "The Yellow Wallpaper" on page 233. In your groups, using the small group discussion board, consider the following questions:

Describe the character in "The Yellow Wallpaper." Is she flat or round, representative or individual?
In the beginning, the narrator refers to her husband John and herself as "ordinary people." What makes the setting and the people at the beginning of the story seem so ordinary? What kind of ordinary person does the narrator seem to be?
When do you notice the first hints of something extraordinary?
Is there an antagonist-protagonist relationship in this story? Why or why not?
What and how do you learn about the narrator's illness? What and how do you learn about the treatment proposed by the doctor-husband?
How does the wallpaper become an obsessive preoccupation in this story? How does its appearance slowly change and shift? How does its meaning change or evolve as the central symbol in the story? What are some major stages?
What is the symbolic contrast between the garden and the enclosed, confined room? Why does the woman, herself, throw the key away?
What, for you, is the symbolic meaning of the way the story ends? Can the ending be read as a kind of liberation? Why or why not?

Part II:
Read the two sample student papers reading the Charlotte Perkins Gilman text (pages 254-258). After reading these two different readings, consider the following questions:

Discussions of the story find symbolic meaning in many key elements of the story. How do the two papers compare in their interpretation of key symbols? How do they read the symbolic meaning of the wallpaper pattern, the woman behind the paper, the creeping, and the peeling of the paper?
Critics have probed the symbolic meaning of the colors green and yellow that play a major role in the story. Do the student writers agree in their reading of the color symbolism in the story?
Like the writing of other earlier women authors, Gilman's story is read by today's readers with a new awareness of traditional gender roles and women's issues. How do the two student papers compare in their estimate of what the story means to today's woman and today's man?

Part III:
Examine your group's first set of responses and look for ways in which your interpretations agreed with and/or disagreed with the sample student essays.
As a group, create one essay that summarizes your group's responses to all of the questions above.

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