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Elements of London's naturalism

Having considered Crane's ideas of naturalism, it is evident that Jack London is identified as a literary naturalist as well. He was familiar with the writings of Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, and he knew the work of such literary naturalists as Stephen Crane. What elements of London's naturalism are evident in "The Law of Life?" Expand on your answer and also how you feel it is relative to Crane's writing.

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Let's look at some information for you to consider for this essay. Like other academic essays, it will have an Introduction, Body and Conclusion. I also attached one relevant resource discussing views on naturalism, including London's, some of which this response is drawn.

RESPONSE:

London had many problems in life, as he was afflicted with alcoholism, mental determination and probably died at 40 probably his own hand (McMichael, 1974). Like many Darwinism theorists, London was seen by some as an Anglo-American racist (Russett, 1976). From his readings and studies, he acquired a Naturalistic slant to his writings.

In fact, London has naturalistic views of life and death. There is evidence of elements of London's naturalism in ""The Law of Life." In London's naturalistic ideas, however, we see a lingering echo of London's study of Darwinism and his devotion to theories proposed by Darwin. For example, we see London depict man's continual fight with the environment, as well as the absence of meaning for the person. According to London, through this struggle with the earth, a person has only one purpose that of reproducing in order to sustain the species:

"Nature did not care. To life she set one task, gave one law. To perpetuate was the task of life, its law was death." (McMichael, 1974, p. 957)

London practically defined ...

Solution Summary

Considering Crane's ideas of naturalism, Jack London is identified as a literary naturalist and familiar with the writings of Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, and he knew the work of such literary naturalists as Stephen Crane. This soltuion explores the elements of London's naturalism that are evident in "The Law of Life?" and how it is relative to Crane's writing. Supplemented with an informative article on nature and society. References are provided.

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