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    Laurie Anderson's From The Air

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    What is the meaning in of the record From the Air by Laurie Anderson?

    Title: From The Air
    Good evening. This is your Captain.
    We are about to attempt a crash landing.
    Please extinguish all cigarettes.
    Place your tray tables in their
    Upright, locked position.
    Your Captain says: Put your head on your knees.
    Your Captain says: Put your head on your hands.
    Captain says: Put your hands on your head.
    Put your hands on your hips. Heh heh.
    This is your Captain-and we are going down.
    We are all going down, together.
    And I said: Uh oh. This is gonna be some day.
    Standby. This is the time.
    And this is the record of the time.
    This is the time. And this is the record of the time.
    Uh-this is your Captain again.
    You know, I've got a funny feeling I've seen this all
    before.
    Why? Cause I'm a caveman.
    Why? Cause I've got eyes in the back of my head.
    Why? It's the heat. Standby.
    This is the time. And this is the record of the time.
    This is the time. And this is the record of the time.
    Put your hands over your eyes. Jump out of the plane.
    There is no pilot. You are not alone. Standby.
    This is the time. And this is the record of the time.
    This is the time. And this is the record of the time.

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    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/language/laurie-andersons-air-6061

    Solution Preview

    In this song, I think that Laurie Anderson is trying to subvert one of the features of modern life: automatic, unemotional language. To do so, she plays with that language. Thus, in order to understand her song, it is imperative to look at her words and word order carefully.
    <br><br>Despite the obvious emergency, the words spoken by the captain are carefully chosen in order not to elicit panic in the passengers. The first line sounds like a prelude to a normal, in-flight commentary by the captain. The next line shatters this expectation by declaring that they are "about to attempt a crash landing". If you look at the wording of line 2, it is a very normal sentence. No emotion is expressed by the pilot. While there is obviously an emergency situation, that ...

    Solution Summary

    Laurie Anderson's From The Air is explored.

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