Share
Explore BrainMass

Aristotle's "On Rhetoric" Questions

The following questions come from the Aristotle On Rhetoric text:

1. Briefly discuss the following emotions: Friendship and Enmity, Fear and Confidence, and Emulation.

2. Briefly describe the three gifts of fortune that affect human character.

3.Outline Aristotle's four general lines of argument.

4.Identify the two general modes of persuasion and provide an example for each.

Solution Preview

1) Friendship and Enmity are basic opposites. Friendship comes from one's ability to wish other positive things even though those things bring no tangible wishes or pleasures to one's self. Those you demonstrate friendship to are your friends, and you will likely share things that you wish positive things for, and will likely share displeasure at similar things.

Enmity is essentially defined by its opposite: friendship. One can have enmity towards another because of a specific reason (a grudge, something that somebody did to you, etc.) or simply because that person is entirely different and 'not a friend' of yours. Anger = pain, hatred does not equal pain to ones self. Anger is directed towards individual (mad at you), whereas hatred is directed towards classes or groups (Nazis hated the Jews, even though basically everybody was innocent of any type of wrongdoing).

Fear is a pain that comes from a mental image of what would, could, or might happen because of something. Fear comes because of destructive evils that result from other things, i.e., "fear of ...

Solution Summary

1. Briefly discuss the following emotions: Friendship and Enmity, Fear and Confidence, and Emulation.

2. Briefly describe the three gifts of fortune that affect human character.

3.Outline Aristotle's four general lines of argument.

4.Identify the two general modes of persuasion and provide an example for each.

$2.19