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Hoist drum questions

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A hoist drum consists of a uniform cylinder of diameter 1.2m, radius of gyration 0.45m and mass 200kg. It is being used to lower a crate of mass of 60 kg which is attached to the hoist by a light, inextensible rope. Initially, the crate is at rest 3.0 m above the ground.

A brake on the drum is accidentally partially released and the crate accelerates uniformly, reaching the ground after 2.20 seconds.

Determine

(a) The linear acceleration of the crate.
(b) The angular acceleration of the drum.
(c) The tension in the cable.
(d) The moment of inertia of the hoist drum.
(e) The friction torque from the brake on the drum.

(See attached for a full description)

A brake on the drum is accidentally partially released and the crate accelerates uniformly, reaching the ground after 2.20 seconds.

Determine

(a) The linear acceleration of the crate.
(b) The angular acceleration of the drum.
(c) The tension in the cable.
(d) The moment of inertia of the hoist drum.
(e) The friction torque from the brake on the drum.

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A hoist drum consists of a uniform cylinder of diameter 1.2m, radius of gyration 0.45m and mass 200kg. It is being used to lower a crate of mass of 60 kg which is attached to the hoist by a light, ...

Solution Summary

The solution explains how you can calculate linear acceleration, angular acceleration, tension, the moment of inertia and friction torque in relation to a hoist drum.

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