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Traumatic Brain Injury Comparison

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Compare and contrast the immediate and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury in early childhood vs. those sustained in later/adolescent years.

(The immediate impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early childhood they adjust better, they are less mindful of their injury, takes longer for the effects to be seen, parents realize that eventual their child will not be the same and their friends are more accepting of their disability. The adolescent years, friends may not comprehend or could not handle the adjustments, not recovering what they knew beforehand, behavioral difficulties and feelings of hopelessness. TBI will change adolescent's sense of physical attractiveness, lacking self-confidence, social awareness, and cognitive abilities (poor attention and concentration). They will have difficulty with academics they knew before, it will seem to be more resilient because of the injury and intellectual problems may be less noticeable than in children.)

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Compare and contrast the immediate and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury in early childhood vs. those sustained in later/adolescent years.

The effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), in early childhood have a better chance at recovery than those of adolescents. The brain is still growing and developing. The immediate impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early childhood they adjust better, they are less mindful of their injury, takes longer for the effects to be seen, parents realize that eventual their child will not be the same and their friends are more accepting of their disability.

TBI has deficits in cognitive impairment and ability. Children with TBI can experience initial memory deficit. Behaviors are primarily learned visually and in social interaction with others. Early childhood students have a far better chance of out-growing or improving in some life functions interrupted by TBI.

When a child sustains a brain injury, these three major ...

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The expert compares and contrasts the immediate and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury in early childhood versus those sustained in later/adolescent years.

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Literature Review for Articles on Brain Injury

Please help with doing a literature review with the following articles:

Lengenfelder, J., Chiaravalloti, N. D., & DeLuca, J. (2007). The efficacy of the generation effect in improving new learning in persons with traumatic brain injury. Rehabilitation Psychology, 52(3), 290.

Yeates, K. O., & Enrile, B. G. (2005). Implicit and explicit memory in children with congenital and acquired brain disorder. Neuropsychology, 19(5), 618.

Donders, J., & Hoffman, N. M. (2002). Gender differences in learning and memory after pediatric traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychology, 16(4), 491.

Guilmette, T. J., & Rasile, D. (1995). Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of three verbal memory measures in the assessment of mild brain injury. Neuropsychology, 9(3), 338.

Johnstone, B., Vieth, A. Z., Johnson, J. C., & Shaw, J. A. (2000). Recall as a function of single versus multiple trials: Implications for rehabilitation. Rehabilitation Psychology, 45(1), 3.

Farmer, J. E., & Johnson-Gerard, M. (1997). Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among educators and rehabilitation staff: A comparative study. Rehabilitation Psychology, 42(4), 273.

Hart, R. P. (1994). Forgetting in traumatic brain-injured patients with persistent memory impairment. Neuropsychology, 8(3), 325.

Haslam, C., Bazen-Peters, C., & Wright, I. (2012). Errorless learning improves memory performance in children with acquired brain injury: A controlled comparison of standard and self-generation techniques. Neuropsychological rehabilitation, 22(5), 697-715.

Arango-Lasprilla, J. C., Quijano, M. C., Nicholls, E., Aponte, M., Lequerica, A. H., Cuervo, M. T., & Rogers, H. (2012). The usefulness of self-generation to improve learning and memory in Spanish-speaking individuals with traumatic brain injury from Colombia. Brain Injury, 26(6), 875-881.

Lajiness-O'Neill, R., Erdodi, L., & Bigler, E. D. (2010). Memory and learning in pediatric traumatic brain injury: a review and examination of moderators of outcome. Applied neuropsychology, 17(2), 83-92.

Alemam, A. I., Mohamad, H. A., & Alhadad, A. A. (2013). Memory and Attention Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury. Egyptian Journal of Neurology, Psychiatry & Neurosurgery, 50(2).

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