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    SQL and Differences in Implementation

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    What is SQL?
    Who owns SQL?
    What are some of the differences in the SQL supported by RDBMS vendors?

    I need to really understand these topics, so easy to read in depth explanations would be great. Thank you.

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    https://brainmass.com/computer-science/java/sql-differences-implementation-76801

    Solution Preview

    SQL and distributions.pdf is attached. I have addressed the points that you have asked as clearly as possible, giving references for you to follow up, wherever required.

    SQL (Structured Query Language) is a database language. It is widely used with a DataBase Management System (DBMS) to query, create and modify databases. Originally it was meant to work with Relational Databases, however now it also supports other databases including ObjectRelational Database Management Systems (ORDBMS).
    Who owns it?
    SQL was created to test a database system based on Edgar Codd's paper on Relational databases "A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks" [1]. Its creators Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond F. Boyce were working at IBM on a relational database system called "System R". However, they don't own the SQL system. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI); a standards committee composed of database experts from industry, academia and software vendors proposed the standard version of SQL in 1986 and later by the International Standards Organization (ISO) in the following year [2]. Therefore the SQL language is open, meaning it is not owned or controlled by any single company [5]. This is one of the reasons why SQL is widely used, even within other proprietary systems and programming languages.
    Characteristics and uniqueness:
    Every programming language is unique, however SQL is different from other "general" programming languages. The basic SQL does not have the concept of general purpose programming as done in C or Java. Extension to ANSI SQL like PL/SQL provides many improvements that allow general programming with SQL. Some aspects of SQL is closer to any declarative programming language like Prolog, Haskell, Miranda, etc. In any case it is certainly a non-procedural database language, as the programmer does not explicitly mention where to look for the data or how to retrieve it. So, with a few modifications the same language can ...

    Solution Summary

    Solution answers the following:
    What is SQL?
    Who owns SQL?
    What are some of the differences in the SQL supported by RDBMS vendors?

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