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Computer Network Security

1. What is the one thing that a virus, a worm, spyware and malicious code have in common? What are the differences among these four threats?
2. How often should you update your anti-virus protection?
3. Why is a best practice to have and to carry an anti-virus boot-up disk or CD?
4. What other anti-malicious software and anti-malicious code applications are included with AVG? What risk and threats do these help mitigate?
5. In a corporate environment, should new AV definitions be installed as soon as they are available?
6. Is the quick scan good enough protection for a system?
7. Besides the ones mentioned above, what other best practices are there for the workstation domain that can mitigate the risks and threats caused by malicious code?
8. If you have an up-to-date AV, do you still need a malware detection program like Windows Defender?
9. What some of the most common symptoms of malware?
10. What are examples of harmful spyware application? What risk or threat do they pose to the workstation domain?

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1. What is the one thing that a virus, a worm, spyware and malicious code have in common? What are the differences among these four threats: a virus, a worm, spyware and malicious code?

Something they all have in common is the fact they are malicious. The differences include the type of attack itself and the way they spread. One example is a virus must have something physical to copy itself with such as a hard drive or a flash drive. A work will simply spread itself through the use of volatile memory, or random access memory. Spyware often slows you internet speeds as it consistently reports information back to the person who created it. According to Vericode.com, Malicious Code is the term used to describe any code in any part of a software system or script that is intended to cause undesired effects, security breaches or damage to a system.

2. How often should you update your anti-virus protection?

I think when you answer this question it is important to remember everyone has a different opinion. Most anti-virus programs recommend you update once a month but from personal experience, I would say that is not enough and I would do it once a week. Kaspersky recommends for their product that you leave auto update on and it checks for an update every two hours.

3. Why is a best practice to have and to carry an ...

Solution Summary

The solution discusses computer network security.

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