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    I am having trouble trying to understand how the following dissociation equation balances

    Could you please explain this to me as my working out has it not to balance
    Thank you

    Ba(OH)2 + H2O-----> Ba+2 + 2OH-

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 5:00 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/chemistry/organic-chemistry/balancing-chemical-equations-20992

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    I am having trouble trying to understand how the following dissociation equation balances
    Could you please explain this to me as my working out has it not to balance?
    Thank you
    Ba(OH)2 + H2O-----> Ba+2 + 2OH-

    If you put an H2O, on the right side the equation will get balanced as per our usual balancing procedure. But here Ba(OH)2 is a is a partially soluble ionic compound.

    When ionic compounds dissolve in water the anions and cations are separated from each other; this is called dissociation. We know that ionic compounds dissociate when they dissolve in water because the solution conducts electricity.
    So, we have Ba+2 and OH- ions in water solution of Ba(OH)2
    Ba(OH)2 + H2O-----> Ba+2 + 2OH- + H2O
    But in scientific notations we never write a dissociation equation in this form. We put an (aq) suffix representing the aqueous solution of the compound. The presence of water in excess is understood by this representation.

    So the correct form of the balanced dissociation equation is,
    Ba(OH)2 (aq)-----> Ba+2 (aq) + 2OH- (aq)

    Here are some examples
    •Potassium chloride dissociates in water into potassium cations and chloride anions
    KCl(aq) = K+ (aq) + Cl- (aq)
    •Copper (II) sulfate dissociates in water into copper (II) cations and sulfate anions
    CuSO4(aq) = Cu+2(aq) + SO42-(aq)

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 5:00 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/chemistry/organic-chemistry/balancing-chemical-equations-20992

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