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Operational & Supply Chain Management

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1) Why are companies interested in operational management today? Why is it important? What is the relationship between operational management and supply chain management? How are operations management functions performed at your organization?

2) What are the major priorities of operations strategy? How have these evolved over time? How are operations and manufacturing linked in an organization? Are operations management and project management used to give your organization a strategic competitive advantage? Why or why not?

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1) Why are companies interested in operational management today? Why is it important? What is the relationship between operational management and supply chain management? How are operations management functions performed at your organization?

Operational Management is the design, operation and improvement of the systems that create and deliver the firm's primary products and services. Companies are interested in learning about Operations Management because it involves the responsibility of ensuring that business operations are efficient and effective. It is the management of resources, distribution of goods and services to customers. By learning about operational management, it is important to know what has been happening in other departments. Marketing managers need to understand what it takes to build and operate production systems in order for them to serve their markets well. Financial managers who plan for capacity expansion need to understand inventories so that they can demand its reduction. Another importance is that companies have to learn operations management and its systematic participation in typical operations management activities may enable a firm to produce a quality product at a competitive price.

Operations management is the planning, control and implementation of the processes that are being used to transform inputs into finished goods and services while supply chain management is involved with the integration of the business processes across the organizations, from material sources and suppliers through manufacturing and processing to the final customer. Operations management and supply chain management should therefore coordinate with each other so that there will be an efficient and timely flow of materials, products, and information within and among organizations.
Operations management is concerned with organizing the process of getting things done and it involves a ...

Solution Summary

The solution discusses the reasons why companies are interested in operational management and its importance to organizations; the relationship between operational management and supply chain management and how operations management are performed in an organization.

It further discusses the major priorities of operations strategy and how they have evolved over time; how operations and manufacturing are linked in an organization and the reasons why operations and project management are used to give organization a strategic competitive advantage.

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See Also This Related BrainMass Solution

Operations management - Supply chain management & the bullwhip effect

See the attached file also.

Question 1:

IF: THEN (all else equal, it is likely that):

a) We aim to increase "inventory velocity" We must produce and push work-in-process faster to next operation/ wait and produce only what is pulled by next operation. EXPLAIN WHY

b) We install an expensive machine that requires The intensity of the "bull whip" in the supply chain
very large production batches but it is fast will increase / decease / not be affected. EXPLAIN WHY

c) We consolidate inventories from two (nearby) "Service level" will increase / decrease/ not be affected warehouses into one warehouse (keeping the same EXPLAIN WHY
amount of inventory)

Question 2:

A plant makes four different models of DeskJet printers. Up to now, it has been producing each model only once every week (for example, Model A on Mondays, Model B on Tuesdays and part of Wednesdays, Model C on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and Model D on Fridays). There is a proposal to move from weekly to daily schedule and produce some of each model every day. Total weekly production output would be the same. Changeover times and costs (from one model to another) are insignificant.

Would this change reduce or increase:
a) The level of inventory of printers in the supply chain after the plant? Why?
b) The level of "work in process" inventory in the plant (i.e., number of printers being assembled)? Why?
c) The intensity of the "bull whip" in the entire supply chain? Why?

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