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Stress, the brain and hormones

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1. Define acute and chronic stress. Provide examples.
2. What region of the brain detects stress and interprets the stimulus as dangerous? What is its function, and where does it relay the signal that conveys the danger? What format is the signal in? What is the role of the region of the brain that receives the stress alert?
3. What is a hormone? What hormones are involved in the stress response? When are hormones released in the stress response?
4. What is the HPA and what role does it play in the stress response?
5. What recommendations are given to counter stress?

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Solution Preview

1. Define acute and chronic stress. Provide examples.

Acute stress is short-term stress, which comes from the recent difficulties that occur in our lives. The stress can help to motivate us into action. After the event causing the stress is over, the stress will pass. For example, you may feel acute stress due to an upcoming midterm. After the midterm, the stress will pass.

Chronic stress is long-term stress, and is caused by situations that have developed over many years. For example, being raised in a dysfunctional family for many years. This type of stress does not easily diminish over time.

2. What region of the brain detects stress and interprets the stimulus as dangerous? What is its function, and where does it relay the signal that conveys the danger? What format is the signal in? What is the role of the region of the brain that receives the stress alert?

The region of the brain that ...

Solution Summary

This solution answers questions about stress, the brain and hormones in 413 words. Seven citations have been provided.

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