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What can one learn about project management? What project management myths are there (if any) that have been debunked regarding project management?

In your own words, please answer the following project management questions...

What can one learn about project management?

What project management myths are there (if any) that have been debunked regarding project management?

What main aspects are important in having a project management career?

What are the similarities and differences between domestic and global project management?

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In your very own words, please answer the following project management questions...

What can one learn about project management?
· Defining the business analyst deliverables in the systems requirements life cycle
· Linking project management planning process to organizational strategic planning process
· Identifying and document high level requirements, initial constraints, and business/technical objectives
· Describing key tailoring principles for types of technology and corporate size
· Developing a plan for user project involvement to reduce risk of project failure
· Identifying key elements of the project plan
· Setting realistic requirements on your projects
· Creating test plans that are adapted to the project risk factors
· Employing conflict resolution techniques to create high performance teams
· Working effectively with users, stakeholders, and team members
· Tailoring project management knowledge and skills to all project types
· Adapting project management approaches to the development environment

What project management myths are there (if any) that have been debunked regarding project management?

1): To be an effective project manager, you've got to be the biggest, meanest, toughest, roughest, SOB (Sweet Old Boy) at the table. Patently false! As long you represent your company's interests with competence and professionalism, then you're doing your job as project manager. Although most jobs start out (usually) friendly if not downright kissy-kissy sometimes, they often end with anger and recriminations. Doing your job on a day-to-day basis is much easier when you act as a responsible professional, and are treated as such by the other professional PM's on the job.

Acting like a goon with the IQ of a fence post, the manners of a NYC taxi driver, and the tact and diplomacy of a crazed Columbian drug lord will get you exactly what that kind of behavior deserves.

2): In order to make money, or to make the most money possible, you've got to lie to and/or screw your subcontractors. Hey, guy, aren't you a Sub to the general contractor you're working for? And if the GC you're working for is going to screw your company, do you think your company will want to work for that GC again? Even if it bids to that GC again, don't you think those numbers will reflect assumed relative risk of being screwed again?

Remember that what goes around comes around, and elephants and subcontractors have long memories. In the end, the bottom line is the bottom line: help your subs make money, and they'll help you make money.

3): Be merciless in the manpower curve hiring process, promise the men anything to get to come on board, then cut them off at the knees the day that they're no longer needed for that instant, that's the business. While manning-up and manning-down is expected by the crews, the key to managing manpower costs is to concentrate on how much a given crew produces, not how much it costs.

Man-hour productivity, not costs, being the key, it doesn't cost a dime extra to treat the men fairly as you can, as you would like to be treated. In the end, you can't go out and put the whole job in by yourself.

4): Women don't make good project managers. WRONG! Some of the very best project managers that have ever sat across at a job conference table have been women. They can be every bit as tough or tougher PM's than men.

5): A great field superintendent by default will make a great Project Manager. Uh-uh, sorry, not quite true. If you do promote a field superintendent to a project manager and he/she turns out to be a good one, all it means is that you had someone with a PM soul and mind-set stuck in a Superintendent's body, and was just waiting to escape its cocoon and show you and the world that they're a PM-butterfly, not a supt.-caterpillar. While every PM should have some field experience, managing a job as opposed to running crews requires completely skillsets and mindsets.

6): Anyone with an engineering degree or Professional Engineer's seal also by default will make a great project manager. False,false,FALSE! Beside being an incredibly snobbish thing to say, it's also ludicrous. Unfortunately, this belief is often espoused by successful business owners who typically are far smarter than any engineer but who feel sometimes intimidated because they don't have the level of formal education of some of the "coats" they deal with in job meetings. An engineering degree is an entree to begin learning the business, not proof the holder of it knows the business already.

7): On a small job, a project manager isn't necessary. If you've worked the size of your company's jobs upwards to where you're dealing with narratives, scopes, and contracts replete with exhibits, then you need a project manager on staff, not a foreman or superintendent that also doubles as one.

What main aspects are important in having a project management career?

Skilled project managers, business analysts, and technical leads make a mighty team. They align themselves with the best developers and business visionaries to develop the most appropriate, cost-effective, and innovative product or process solution. In this partnership, the project manager relies on business analysts to assist in providing accurate project objectives, system ...

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