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Basic Motivation Model (Description and benefits)

Part 1

Describe the Basic Motivation Model (BMM) and discuss how it may (a) affect a leader's values and cultural perception and (b) describe Darley's Law and use it to explain the behavior of Enron's leaders and the organization's eventual downfall.

Part 2

Referencing the BMM, discuss how it may (a) prove beneficial in enhancing a leader's understanding of RQ and therefore developing a better understanding of their followers, (b) how it may assist leaders in the executive development and growth of minority leaders and (c) the development of effective novel reward behaviors (NRB) relevant for their employees.

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Part 1

Describe the Basic Motivation Model (BMM) and discuss how it may (a) affect a leader's values and cultural perception and (b) describe Darley's Law and use it to explain the behavior of Enron's leaders and the organization's eventual downfall.
Basic Motavational model was presented by Maslow.
Each of us is motivated by needs. Our most basic needs are inborn, having evolved over tens of thousands of years. Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs helps to explain how these needs motivate us all.
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs states that we must satisfy each need in turn, starting with the first, which deals with the most obvious needs for survival itself.
Only when the lower order needs of physical and emotional well-being are satisfied are we concerned with the higher order needs of influence and personal development.
Conversely, if the things that satisfy our lower order needs are swept away, we are no longer concerned about the maintenance of our higher order needs.
Maslow's original Hierarchy of Needs model was developed between 1943-1954, and first widely published in Motivation and Personality in 1954. At this time the Hierarchy of Needs model comprised five needs. This original version remains for most people the definitive Hierarchy of Needs.

1. Biological and Physiological needs - air, food, drink, shelter, warmth, sex, sleep, etc.
2. Safety needs - protection from elements, security, order, law, limits, stability, etc.
3. Belongingness and Love needs - work group, family, affection, relationships, etc.
4. Esteem needs - self-esteem, achievement, mastery, independence, status, dominance, prestige, managerial responsibility, etc.
5. Self-Actualization needs - realising personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences.
1. This model may affect a leaders values depending on the needs of the leader. For instance if the leader has a strong need for belongingness, then he may give great value of work groups and teams.
2. Also if the leader has strong esteem needs he will value those employees who are strong achievers.
3. In many companies those leaders who have strong self-actualization needs will give great importance to self growth.

THIS BASIC MODEL ALSO EXPLAINS HOW IT MAY AFFECT THE CULTURAL PERCEPTIONS OF A LEADER
A leader with strong safely need will emphasize and evaluate the culture based on safety and security. For example, when such a person became a CEO in the bank, he increased the expenditure on security by 10 times!
A leader with strong biological and physiological needs will emphasize biological needs of the employee. For example, when a new CEO joined a software company he got 50 doughnut machines installed on his floor and increased the number of rest rooms by 200%!

Latane and Darley attempted, in 1970, to compare the variables that most inhibited bystanders from taking responsibility for intervention. Their experiment involved showing students on a monitor an 'experimenter' working a shock generator. He was then seen to scream, be thrown against a wall and fall to the ground, with ...

Solution Summary

The solution discusses basic motivation models.

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