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Human Resources Role and Impact

HR professionals are often heard requesting a "seat at the table." In other words, they have a desire to be viewed as a strategic business partner who is helping to drive change and implement policy.

What do you see as some of the barriers HR professionals face in their efforts to be viewed as true business partners?
What can the HR professional do to position him- or herself as a business partner?
What is the significance in having that "place at the table"?

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Barriers HR professionals face to be true business partners

For years Human Resources has been thought of as the gopher or dumping place for the unwanted tasks of Administrative staff or the unwanted Administrative tasks. These were viewed as less then inferior or remedial job requirements for specific managers. Thus, this department was formed personnel management (there is a deeper origin but for the purpose of this report, I will not go back that far but merely provide the label from prior the 80's), come the early part of the 80's things became a little more specialized and developed, then term Human Resource Management was then implemented in place of personnel management.

There are several hurdles for HR professionals when it comes to being considered true and equal business partners. Two that are typically found in my industry (gaming/casinos) is Communications and employee talent and development. When addressing the lack of communications between departments, managers and employees or a better fluctuation of control when dealing with specific issues or concerns. Management expects HR to perform miracles with virtually nothing to assist them in the process. When HR is unable to meet these expectations and demands, they are looked down upon as being excess weight or not viewed with the having the potential of being a valued asset to the company, the HR ...

Solution Summary

The solution provides and explanation of the barriers for HR professionals.