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Listening to Help

In Ronald Adler and Neil Towne's text "Looking Out, Looking In", the authors list several ways that we listen to help. They include:

1. Advising: offering a solution ("I think you should do this...")
2, Judging: evaluating the sender's message ("Your boss is a jerk, anyway.")
3. Analyzing: interpreting the message ("From what you've told me, I think she's doing that because...")
4. Questioning: asking questions to further understand the sender's message ("How did he react to that?")
5. Supporting: support the sender by offering agreement, praise, offers to help, reassurance, or diversion. ("Let me know if you want to talk more...I'm here for you.")
6. Prompting: using silences and brief statements of encouragement to encourage the speaker to continue talking. ("Uh huh.")
7. Paraphrasing: Reiterating the speaker's thoughts and putting them into question form for clarity. ("So what I hear you saying is...").

These different examples are more focused to personal relationships. How could you adapt them to be useful in an organization? If you have a current manager, does he or she use any of these techniques in a useful way?

Reference

Adler, R. and Towne, N. (1996). Looking out, looking in. Ninth Edition. Fort Worth, TX:Harcourt Brace.

Some of these techniques we use currently. The instructor wants us to find three outside sources and conduct a sort of interview asking this question. I have two and am looking for a third on this. It just needs a brief statement on each element.

Thanks. If you do use references/ please provide them.

Solution Preview

Please see response attached, which is also presented below.

RESPONSE:

1. Advising: offering a solution ("I think you should do this...")

Advising could be used in the initial contact, when setting up the interview. For example, for one interview, the interviewer advised me to go to their website and read some material in preparation for the interview.

It might be used to advise the incumbent about the necessary skills and competencies, but this is usually written into the job description.

Can you think of others?

2. Judging: evaluating the sender's message ("Your boss is a jerk, anyway.")

Judging should perhaps be used sparingly and with caution. However, it could be used in response to the incumbent's answer to a situation and/or competency-based question e.g., "Your intervention was very successful."

3. Analyzing: interpreting the message ("From what you've told me, I think she's doing that because...")

This is useful to check out that you indeed understood the message from the incumbent or analyzing the goodness of fit between the incumbent's past experiences and the new position e.g. From what ...

Solution Summary

Referring to listening when helping, this solution examines how a person could adapt them to be useful in an organization. .

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