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HR: Experience with performance appraisals; motivating or a waste of time.

What is your experience with performance appraisals? Overall, have you found them motivating, de-motivating, a waste of time, or invaluable?

As you answer this question, please give a personal example to illustrate your answer and use one outside reference to enhance and/or support your perspective of appraisals.

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Performance Appraisal Systems

My experience with appraisals is that they are one of the most hated business processes in Corporate America. I know this both as a manager appraising employees and an employee who was apprised.

The problem is that despite efforts to make them factual, they are still subjective. I would spend hours developing my own accomplishments that I would send to my boss. I would spend days in appraisal meetings to rank employees for a mindless force-fitting process that would give only 10-15% of employees in a group the top rating. My colleague managers would try to convince me and other managers that their people should get the top rating and everyone else would do the same. What a waste of time.

I remember one year during which I got a great letter of commendation from a business unit director for work I did and my boss gave me a poor rating that almost cost me my job when our group went the a downsizing.

If you want I could go on. After working over 20 years for a specific I finally got the top rating in my last assignment.

Here some additional Resources and References

Typical Appraisal System
The Puzzle of Micromanaging Managers

When we bog senior staff down with mind-numbing procedures, we clearly aren't giving them the trust and support they deserve

Think, for instance, about the typical corporate performance-review process. As an HR person myself, I would think that a critical priority would be to implement the simplest and most time-effective performance-appraisal system ever. But that's not always what I see. Companies heap process on process and form on top of form, tying up managers' (and their teams') time. And that's a mistake. If we don't trust our managers to manage well, maybe what we need is new managers (or more ...

Solution Summary

The solution was written by an HR person who deals with performance appraisals in his work. He explains and demonstrates his position with example and personal history. He also includes two professional articles about the subject, which are both excellent for content.

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