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The Mr. Yang & Mr. Jain spicy food scenario is addressed.

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I need some help with this case below.

On a recent trip to India, Mr. Yang, a prominent Chinese executive, dined with his client Himanshu Jain. Mr. Yang commented that the food was spicy, which Mr. Jain interpreted as an opportunity to discuss Indian cuisine. After lengthy explanations, Mr. Yang commented again that the food was spicy. What happened? What barrier is likely getting in the way of clear communication and how could this barrier have been overcome.

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Discussion for your question:

This situation demonstrates a cultural barrier. When we look at this scenario, we see that Mr. Yang, who is from a different culture than Mr. Jain, commented that the Indian food was spicy. After Mr. Jain saw this as an opportunity to engage in discussion, Mr. Yang again made the same comment. We can see a few different things in this scenario based on the information given. Mr. Jain gave a lengthy explanation as to why Indian food is spicy. This informs us that this was not a two-way, involved conversation ...

Solution Summary

On a recent trip to India, Mr. Yang, a prominent Chinese executive, dined with his client Himanshu Jain. Mr. Yang commented that the food was spicy, which Mr. Jain interpreted as an opportunity to discuss Indian cuisine. After lengthy explanations, Mr. Yang commented again that the food was spicy. What happened? What barrier is likely getting in the way of clear communication and how could this barrier have been overcome.

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