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zero tolerance policy for L. monocytogenes in the U.S.

1.) Discuss the zero tolerance policy for L. monocytogenes in the U.S. relative to the control policies in other countries.

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Pathogens are considered to be adulterants in ready to eat food (RTE), yet FSIS and FDA rarely put or set tolerances on this (Listeria monocytogenes: Adapted from Dr. Linda Harris, PHR 150 notes, 2006). However in 1985, after such devastating outbreaks of listeriosis associated with cheese consumption, FDA began their monitoring especially with dairy products. After more cases of sporadic case of listeria contamination of of food products (ie., turkey franks reposted by CDC in 1989), the USDA started to require microbiological surveillance against L. monocytogenes for ready-to-eat meat products as well as implementing a zero tolerance policy which prohibits anyone from selling RTE meat products known to be contaminated by L. monocytogenes (Listeria monocytogenes: Adapted from Dr. Linda Harris, PHR 150 notes, 2006)

Under this policy, L. monocytogenes was considered to be an "adulterant". If an RTE food was found to contain L. monocytogenes at a level of 50 g sample, that food ...

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