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From your research develop two pairs of hypotheses. Choose one of them and test it using ANOVA.

Employers have discovered when employees are given a choice of working the same, fewer, or more hours at the same rate of pay, most would prefer to work the same number of hours. An additional one-fourth of the employees would prefer to work more hours and earn more money, while 8 percent would prefer to work fewer hours and earn proportionately less. These statistics, based on information obtained from a new question added to the May 1985 supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS), indicate that well over half of all workers are satisfied with their present hours and pay.
A closer review of these statistics tells us that very few employed people want to work fewer hours and earn correspondingly less money. Interestingly enough women
were more likely than men to prefer the reduced hours and reduced earnings. If we look closer to this portion of the survey results we would find that this group is described more specifically as women between the ages of 35 and 44.
The degree of satisfaction with current hours and pay rises steadily with age. It is also positively related to the number of hours worked and the weekly earnings level. The survey indicates that the "more hours and more money" choice is most popular with the younger generation, many of whom are working only part-time and its popularity appears to decline steadily with age.
Employers have found that the preferences about hours and pay differed by age and gender, as well as by present earnings level and actual hours worked. The correlation between the workweek preference and various worker and job characteristics were generally expected but some were surprising. For example, as weekly earnings rose, so did the proportion of workers expressing satisfaction with their current schedules and the proportion of individuals opting for fewer hours and less pay.

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From your research develop two pairs of hypotheses. Choose one of them and test it using ANOVA.

Employers have discovered when employees are given a choice of working the same, fewer, or more hours at the same rate of pay, most would prefer to work the same number of hours. An additional one-fourth of the employees would prefer to work more hours and earn more money, while 8 percent would prefer to work fewer hours and earn proportionately less. These statistics, based on information obtained from a new question added to the May 1985 supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS), indicate that well over half of all workers are satisfied with their present hours and pay.
A closer review of these statistics tells us that very few employed people want to work fewer hours and earn correspondingly less money. Interestingly enough women
were more likely than men to prefer the reduced hours and reduced earnings. If we look closer to this portion of the survey results we would find that this group is described more specifically as women between the ages of 35 and 44.
The degree of satisfaction with current hours and pay rises steadily with age. It is also positively related to the number of hours worked and the weekly earnings level. The survey indicates that the "more hours and more money" choice is most popular with the younger generation, many of whom are working only part-time and its popularity appears to decline steadily with age.
Employers have found that the preferences about hours and pay differed by age and gender, as well as by present earnings level and actual hours worked. The correlation between the workweek preference and various worker and job characteristics were generally expected but some were surprising. For example, as weekly earnings rose, so did the proportion of workers expressing satisfaction with their current schedules and the proportion of individuals opting for fewer hours and less pay.

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  • BSc , Wuhan Univ. China
  • MA, Shandong Univ.
Recent Feedback
  • "Your solution, looks excellent. I recognize things from previous chapters. I have seen the standard deviation formula you used to get 5.154. I do understand the Central Limit Theorem needs the sample size (n) to be greater than 30, we have 100. I do understand the sample mean(s) of the population will follow a normal distribution, and that CLT states the sample mean of population is the population (mean), we have 143.74. But when and WHY do we use the standard deviation formula where you got 5.154. WHEN & Why use standard deviation of the sample mean. I don't understand, why don't we simply use the "100" I understand that standard deviation is the square root of variance. I do understand that the variance is the square of the differences of each sample data value minus the mean. But somehow, why not use 100, why use standard deviation of sample mean? Please help explain."
  • "excellent work"
  • "Thank you so much for all of your help!!! I will be posting another assignment. Please let me know (once posted), if the credits I'm offering is enough or you ! Thanks again!"
  • "Thank you"
  • "Thank you very much for your valuable time and assistance!"
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