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Cinderella, a character profile comparison

We always hear the Cinderella story from the perspective of the Cinderella character. So, to highlight and acknowledge multiple perspectives within a family system, retell the Cinderella story twice, from the perspective of two alternative family members. For example, you might tell the story once from the perspective of the stepmother and once from the perspective of the prince.

1.Describe the values and beliefs each character might hold, which would explain how he or she acts in the story.

2.Reflect on and articulate what you learned about acknowledging multiple perspectives, through this exercise.
How would viewing multiple perspectives affect the way you would work with families?

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1. Describe the values and beliefs each character might hold, which would explain how he or she acts in the story.

Cinderella herself an orphan and living with a stepmother and her daughters as their maid, is a very strong character. She reflects the absolute position of someone alone, indigent and exploited by her relatives in a cruel way.

The prince is a good hearted, loving person, who falls in love with Cinderella, because she is pure, her character is not filled with pretenses or arrogance like other girls who try to get the Prince's attention and hope to marry him. But, the Prince liked Cinderella, as she left at midnight, in a hurry and her glass shoe came off while she ran to the Pumpkin cart so that she could get home in time.

Cinderella only wants to go to the Ball in the Castle, just to get away from the daily grind of her everyday life and just like any girl, she is excited to go, at the risk of leaving her house, ...

Solution Summary

Multiple perspectives, Cinderella story characters' profiles' comparisons

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