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    Society’s Response to Crime

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    Society's response to crime has changed over the past century. The approach of rehabilitation in the 1960s has gradually been replaced with a "get tough on crime" approach, bringing in mandatory sentencing laws and long prison sentences. Regardless of the approach, crime continues to be a problem, and recidivism for some crimes and some offenders remains high.
    Research the ideas of justice, based on this research analyze the usefulness of the ideas of justice in lowering recidivism. Addressing the following:
    1) Is restorative justice useful in lowering the rate of recidivism? For which types of crimes and offenders is it most useful? Make sure to include any demographic information that may be useful in defending this type of "justice."
    2) Is procedural or moral justice more applicable for this aim? For which types of crimes and offenders is it most useful? make sure to include any demographic information that may defend one or the other.
    3) Which type of justice is most useful based on the psychological theories of crime? For which types of crimes and offenders is it most useful?
    Provide references where apply.

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    https://brainmass.com/psychology/cognitive-psychology-theories-and-theorists/societys-response-crime-606492

    Solution Preview

    (1) Is restorative justice useful in lowering the rate of recidivism? For which types of crimes and offenders is it most useful? Make sure to include any demographic information that may be useful in defending this type of "justice."

    Proponents of restorative justice assert that the function can be beneficial in lowering the rate at which offenders commit crimes Tyler, Sherman, Strang, Barnes, & Woods, 2007). They suggest that this benefit is due to psychological mechanisms of "reintegrative shaming and procedural justice. Tyler et al utilized data from an Australian sample focused on examining psychological mechanism on drinking and driving. The Australian Reintegrative Shaming Experiment (RISE) was used to assess through the use of police records the long-term impact of " reintegrative shaming and procedural justice" relative to supporting the law; and later as it relates to recidivism.

    The theory of procedural justice holds that fair procedures lead to a further compliance of the law as it is viewed as legitimate. Therefore in the words of Tyler et al (2007) "The procedural justice argument is supported by authorities who accept the legal decisions. Moreover, in their opinion, restorative justice have some of the same features as procedural justice

    These police records indicate whether people were arrested for re-offending both during the two-year period prior to the second interview (Years 1-2), and during the two-year period following the second interview (Years 3-4).1

    Tyler et al (2007) hypothesized that their restorative justice conferences will be more oriented toward feelings of procedural justice and shaming that the traditional process of court disposition. They assert that procedural justice and morality together provide support for the law and future compliance.
    Tyler et al (2007) study devaluate the impact of restorative justice conferences relative to people's behavior to rule breaking. Findings of the Tyler et al (2007) study suggest that both traditional court-based dispositions and conferences aimed at restorative justice increases support for the low and decrease the future rate of crime. However, according to Tyler et al (20007) findings suggest that the rate of offending only drops if attention is given to the problem of rule breaking. Moreover, authorities never understand how to effectively deal with ...

    Solution Summary

    This solution examines the relationship of restorative justice and recidivism.

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