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Cognitive Theories

I need guidance in tackling the following questions. The textbook we are using for this class is:

Parrott III, L. (2003). Counseling and psychotherapy (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole/Thomson Learning.

The questions are:

1. Do you agree with the necessity for "autonomy" as defined by the cognitive theorist in the text? Why or why not?

2. Do you think cognitive theory is simplistic? Why or why not?

3. Discuss what "positive addictions" you practice, or would like to practice.

Thank you very much for your advice.

Solution Preview

Dear Student,
Your solution is also attached as a word file. Use this solution as your guide. Adopt it to your own situation to make it personal.

Sincerely,
OTA 105878
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Cognitive Theories: Q&A

1. Do you agree with the necessity for "autonomy" as defined by the cognitive theorist in the text? Why or why not?
- . Cognitivism, as the theory & practice is known, seeks to explain how people understand, diagnose & solve problems, looking at the cause & effect relationship of stimulus & the corresponding reaction to it. Based on the Gestalt psychology theories of Wertheirmer, Köhler, Koffka & Piaget (whose cognitive research on child development became invaluable in understanding the incremental changes in ability & cognition), and the practice provides two rules on cognitive solutions through intervention: Algorithms & Heuristics. Human cognition, theorists argue is what makes us so unique in our choices - it helps us understand our world and practice free will guided by our sense of reason. Autonomy is important because it is what makes individual cognition so unique - it is an independent process that happens because of, within and despite the individual. In robotics, autonomy is expressed in robots allowed to work without human intervention so as to show the principles that it follows when it regulates itself. In other ...

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