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Memory: Forgetting

Research indicates that sometimes efforts to retrieve memory fail. Context or content cues or multiple cues for the same memory increase the likelihood that the information can be accessed. In some cases, it is important to forget what has been learned, to replace one memory with another. That is why memory is considered constructive or reconstructive.

1). Does the statement above mean that in some cases it is important to forget what has been learned because it might be that what was learned previously is incorrect information? Therefore, it is more constructive or beneficial for one to forget what was learned to open or reconstruct new learned information into memory so that one's memory stays current. In essence, one's memory becomes more efficient and effective when needed. Forgetting helps to limit what we have to recall and to limit errors and so. I am close to why it is sometimes important to forget what has been learned.

2). Can you clarify what is meant with the paragraph above that states, "Context or content cues or multiple cues for the same memory increases the likelihood that the information can be accessed."?

3). Briefly, explain why do you think it is sometimes important to forget what has been learned?

Use scholarly sources to support your answers. Cite all sources with APA format.

Solution Preview

1. I think that the statement above does mean that in some cases it is important to forget what has been learned, do to the fact that what was learned previously is incorrect information, as well as the fact that the previously learned information may be correct but impractical for utilization at this later time. Due to these factors, it is indeed more constructive to forget what has been learned when it is no longer useful, and to construct new learning information into memory that is more contingent to present conditions or needs. Due ...

Solution Summary

The expert examines memory forgetting efforts.

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