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The neurophysiological nature of aggressive behavior

This solution provides an answer for the neurophysiological basis of aggressive behavior, and how it can be controlled.

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What is the nature of aggressive behavior? How do you think aggressive behavior can be controlled?

Fear and other aversive stimuli are known to cause aggressive behavior, which is controlled by the amygdala. Meanwhile, "the central nucleus of the amygdala is the single most important part of the brain for the expression of emotional responses provoked by aversive stimuli" (Carlson, 2010, p. 368). Aggressive behavior is learned and has been demonstrated by classical conditioning. It is also species-typical and useful functions are served by it (e.g. defending oneself and mate against a predator). Catecholamine's such as epinephrine and stress hormones play a part as well as they are released when a human is threatened, and this leads to the ...

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This solution provides an answer for the neurophysiological basis of aggressive behavior, and how it can be controlled.

Reference

Carlson, N.R. (2010). Physiology of behavior. (10th ed.) Boston, MA: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

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