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Explaining Violent Crime: Social Process Theory

I ned help getting started on this question. In a minimum of 250 words, use violent crime as an example to discuss the major tenets and usefulness of one social process theory. What are the possible policy implications of this approach?

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Subject is: Social Process Theories: Socialized to Crime

Text Book: The criminology: The core (3rd edition)by Larry J. Siegel

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RESPONSE:

1. In a minimum of 250 words, use violent crime as an example to discuss the major tenets and usefulness of one social process theory. What are the possible policy implications of this approach?

In general, a social process theory, which says that criminal behavior, is a function of a socialization process, including the socio-psychological interaction by the offender with institutions and social organizations.

Social Learning Theory

Social learning theory suggests that offenders turn to crime as a result of peer group pressure, family problems, poor school performance, legal entanglements and other situations that gradually steer them to criminal behaviors. This theory says that anyone can become a criminal. The main support of this theory stems from the effect of the family on youths who engage in delinquent or violent behaviors. Researchers think there is a linkage between childhood experiences of violence and behavioral problems. In these experiences, children can be victims or eyewitnesses. According to Wolfe, children who witness family violence are more likely to display diminished social competence and behavioral problems than those who do not.

Why do people engage in crime according to social learning theory? "They learn to engage in crime, primarily through their association with others. They are reinforced for crime, they learn beliefs that are favorable to crime, and they are exposed to criminal models. As a consequence, they come to view crime as something that is desirable or at least justifiable in certain situations. The primary version of social learning theory in criminology is that of Ronald Akers and the description that follows draws heavily on his work. Akers's theory, in turn, represents an elaboration of Edwin Sutherland's differential association theory (also see the related work of Albert Bandura in psychology)" (.http://law.jrank.org/pages/815/Crime-Causation-Sociological-Theories-Social-learning-theory.html).

According to social learning theory, juveniles learn to engage in crime in the same way they learn to engage in conforming behavior: through association with or exposure to others. Primary or intimate groups like the family and peer group have an especially large impact on what we learn. In fact, association with delinquent friends ...

Solution Summary

Explanation of violent crime through a social process perspective, including the possible policy implications of this approach.

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