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Behaviorism: Pet and workplace

About 150-200 words question is good. Thank You

1. Some behaviorists would argue that your pet doesn't really (or can't) "love" you. Rather, they suggest that your pet's behaviors (no matter how cute and adorable) are products of shaping and behavioral principles. What do you think?

2. How might you apply principles of behaviorism (e.g., conditioning, reinforcement, etc.) at the workplace?

Thank you please list any reference you may use.

Solution Preview

1. Some behaviorists would argue that your pet doesn't really (or can't) "love" you. Rather, they suggest that your pet's behaviors (no matter how cute and adorable) are products of shaping and behavioral principles. What do you think?

It seems that pets can really "love" you, at least in the animal sense, as pets protect their master and it is unlikely there were conditioned to do this. Cats sense when their owner is sad and will come up and purr and jump up on her or his lap and cuddle, as if they are attempting to cheer the owner up or console them. They sense something is wrong and show "love" to the owner to cheer them up. Even cats get protective of their owners, and may "hiss" at a stranger that approached. And the average pet is not trained or conditioned to be protective of its owner or to sense when the owner is feeling sad or angry, at ...

Solution Summary

Explores if your pet doesn't really (or can't) "love" you, but are products of shaping and behavioral principles. It also how a person might you apply principles of behaviorism (e.g., conditioning, reinforcement, etc.) at the workplace. References are included.

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