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National American Government

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For much of 2011 and 2012, public dissatisfaction with Congress rose to all time highs, with 70-80% expressing disapproval with how Congress does its job. Many commentators note that Americans are fed up with Washington "grid-lock" that makes government apparently unable to address important problems. Other observers believe that the national government is acting according to its design, based on separation of powers and checks and balances.

In at least 200-250 words, analyze how the U.S. Constitution implements separation of powers and checks and balances. Briefly explain why the constitutional framers based the new government on these ideas. Evaluate how separation of powers and checks and balances are working out in practice today, justifying your assessment with persuasive reasoning and examples.

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I know this went a bit long, but you can take what you want from it and leave the rest.

The US Constitution is quite clear that, in order for a bill to become law, it must pass the House, Senate, and be signed by the President. All must be on board for a law to pass. Later on, the development of judicial activism led to the doctrine of 'judicial review' where the Supreme Court developed the power to stop any law it deemed unconstitutional. In the Federalist Papers, we read:

"No political truth is certainly of greater intrinsic value, or is stamped with the authority of more enlightened patrons of liberty, than that on which the objection is founded. The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very ...

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National American Government - Representative

The Constitution states, "The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States..." (Art. I, Sec. 2). Contrast this with the original constitutional language for the other house of Congress, "The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years..." (Art. I, Sec. 3). The phrase "chosen by the Legislature" was changed to "elected by the people" by the 17th Amendment, but not until 1912. In other words, from the beginning the House of Representatives was intended to be exactly what its name suggests - representative of the people. (Note that in 2010 the Tea Party, and some Republican politicians, called for repeal of the 17th Amendment, eliminating the popular vote for Senators. While most Republican politicians have backed away from that view, many Tea Party chapters continue to demand its repeal.)

Textbook models suggest how members of the House of Representatives may fulfill their constitutional duty to "represent" - the delegate model, the trustee model, the oversight model, and the service model. A weakness of these models is that they ignore the pervasive influence of interest groups, partisanship, and political money (campaign contributions) on the behavior of congressional reps. To what extent do these factors interfere with effective representation?

Before writing your initial post, review the assigned resources.

After researching your representative by using the assigned resources, identify one important issue directly related to your rep's committee or subcommittee work in Congress. Summarize your representative's position on this focus issue as described on his or her website or illustrated by legislation sponsored by your rep. Be concrete and specific. Avoid vague generalities like "my representative is for jobs" or "my Congressman is for national security."

With respect to this focus issue, evaluate your representative's performance as a representative of the people in your legislative district. Justify your assessment from two perspectives:

How well does your rep's position on that issue reflect your district's likely preferences or broad interests on the issue? Support your inferences about the district with fact-based evidence - not just your opinion about the district or your rep's position on the focus issue. Demonstrate how your rep does or does not reflect his or her constituency on this issue. Consider your rep's committee memberships and seniority.
Discuss fact-based evidence about how interest groups, political party loyalty, or campaign money may influence your representative. Can these influences weaken his or her effectiveness as a true "representative" of the district? Consider whether the district is considered a "safe" seat or a competitive district. Put on your critical thinking cap to respond to this aspect of the question.

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