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Trials, Juries and Civil Rights

1. About Trial Juries:
a. How are jurors selected?
b. How long do they serve?
c. Could You be selected? If yes, why? If no, why not?
d. What do jurors do during a criminal trial?
e. What choices for a verdict to trial juries have?

2. About Due Process:
a. Explain what that means in general
b. Explain what would be due process at your arrest, booking, arraignment, preliminary hearing(s), and trial.

3. Assume that you are living in these United States before 1960, that is before the Civil Rights Movement and the Civil Rights Laws that were passed then and which are still the laws of the land now.
a. What were racially segregated schools?
b. What were some of the other racially based legal or non-legal discriminatory practices you might have faced?
c. What were freedom rides? What were they meant to achieve?
d. In which ways and areas do Civil Rights Laws affect YOUR life today?

Solution Preview

1. About Trial Juries:
a. How are jurors selected? Jurors are selected from a pool of eligible citizens who are then introduced to the case, questioned by attorneys and either accepted or rejected. Some states use voter rolls, others drivers to create the pools of eligible jury members.
b. How long do they serve? Until the case is resolved, either through plea bargain, judge dismissal, or verdict rendered by jury. (Some juries are required to also render a sentence recommendation.)
c. Could You be selected? If yes, why? If no, why not? Yes because I am a legal driver with a driver's license and have attained the age of 18 in the state of Florida.
d. What do jurors do during a criminal trial? Listen to the facts of the case as presented by the prosecution and defense, consider the evidence, follow the instruction of the judge and render a verdict based on presented evidence from both sides.
e. What ...

Solution Summary

Discussions on juries, trials, due process, and the Civil Rights movement as pertains to legal rights and the Freedom Riders.

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