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    How does the Moon cause the Earth's tides. What are the two types of tides and why do they occur?

    What are the different theories proposed for the formation of the Moon. What is the most widely accepted theory?

    Thanks.

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    https://brainmass.com/physics/planets/tidal-effects-formation-moon-349229

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    How does the Moon cause the Earth's tides?
    The gravitational forces of the Moon and the Sun cause tides to occur on Earth. Basically, the Moon 's gravitational pull is trying to attract Earth to it, but it is only strong enough to effect the water on Earth, such as the oceans and the larger lakes of our planet.
    What are the two types of tides and why do they occur?
    The two types of tides are the Diurnal Tides and the Semi-diurnal Tides.
    When the Moon is furthest from the Earth's equator, it causes a Diurnal Tide, which means that there is a single high and a single low tide occurring each day.
    When the Moon is over the Earth's equator, a Semi-diurnal Tide is likely to occur, which means that there are two high and two low waters occurring daily and that they are of relatively small ranges.
    When the Moon moves furthest north or south of the equator, they may become Mixed Tides, which means that there are large variances in tidal ranges during the two daily tides.
    (I am unsure as to whether you need this information or not, so I decided to be on the safe side and include it for you).
    The two types of range variations are called the Spring Tides and the Neap Tides.
    Spring Tides are caused when the Sun and the Moon are properly aligned, such as when the Moon is a full Moon or a new Moon, which causes an exceptionally strong gravitational force to create very high and very low tides on Earth. The Proxigean Spring Tide is a rare occurrence that happens when the Moon is both very close to the earth and in the new Moon phase (meaning that it is between the Sun and the Earth); this creates a very high tide.
    Neap Tides occur when the Sun and the Moon are not aligned because they are separated by 90 degrees This causes there to be a quarter Moon, and creates a lack of a gravitational connection between the Moon and the Sun, which creates a small variance between the low and the high tides on Earth.
    What are the different theories proposed for the formation of the Moon. What is the most widely accepted theory?
    There are four main theories to explain the formation of the moon; the Fission Theory, the Capture Theory, the Condensation Theory, and the Giant Impactor Theory.
    The Fission Theory proposes that the Moon was at one point a part of the Earth and managed to separate from the Earth through rapidly spinning early in the history of the solar system. Those that follow this theory generally believe that the Moon came from the Pacific Ocean Basin prior to its separation from Earth. This theory is largely discounted because this theory has many holes in it: There is no fossil connection between the Earth and the Moon; the composition of rocks on the Earth and the Moon are somewhat different from each other; a rotation speed powerful enough to detach a piece of the Earth would be unlikely to be weak enough for the piece to be caught in the Earth's orbit; and if it were thrown off by the Earth, then if would rotate around the Earth's equator rather than at a tilt 18-28 degrees. This hypotheses also does not explain the extra baking that the lunar material has received.
    The Capture Theory proposes that the Moon was created elsewhere in the solar system and was later captured by the Earth's gravitational pull. This theory is generally discounted due to the improbability of an object to pass by the Earth at just the right speed and just the right time to get caught in the Earth's gravitational pull. This hypotheses also does not explain the extra baking that the lunar material has received.
    The Condensation Theory proposes that the Moon and the Earth were both condensed from the nebula that formed the solar system, with the Moon forming in orbit around the Earth. This is largely discounted because if the Earth and the Moon were formed within the vicinity of each other, then they would have nearly the same composition, such as a significant iron core, which the moon does not possess. This hypotheses also does not explain the extra baking that the lunar material has received.
    The Giant Impactor, or Ejected Ring Theory, is the most widely accepted theory. This theory proposes that a planetesimal or small planet (about the size of Mars) struck the Earth just after the formation of the solar system, causing large volumes of heated material to eject from the outer layers of both objects. This matter eventually stuck together to form the Moon. Basically put, something hit the Earth and caused part of the outer layer of the Earth's crust to be ejected into space, where they would eventually come together to form the Moon.


    Websites that I find useful for this information:
    For information on tides:
    • http://home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/moontides/
    • http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/8r.html
    For information on the different theories proposed for the formation of the moon:
    • http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question38.htm
    • http://www.psi.edu/projects/moon/moon.html

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 9:09 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/physics/planets/tidal-effects-formation-moon-349229

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